ShareThis Page
Out & About

Out & About: Seton Hill hosts author Gretchen McNeil

| Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, 9:00 p.m.
Program director Nicole Peeler and author Gretchen McNeil at a reception for the Seton Hill University's MFA in Popular Fiction program, held Jan. 9 in the Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Program director Nicole Peeler and author Gretchen McNeil at a reception for the Seton Hill University's MFA in Popular Fiction program, held Jan. 9 in the Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
Students Contessa Blosenhauer of Brockport, N.Y., and Louise Legier-McGinnis of Chesapeake, Va., wait to have their books signed by author Gretchen McNeil, during a reception for Seton Hill University's MFA in Popular Fiction program, held Jan. 9 at the university's Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Students Contessa Blosenhauer of Brockport, N.Y., and Louise Legier-McGinnis of Chesapeake, Va., wait to have their books signed by author Gretchen McNeil, during a reception for Seton Hill University's MFA in Popular Fiction program, held Jan. 9 at the university's Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
From left: Author Gretchen McNeil joins Susan Jessen of Painesville, Ohio, and Jeni Fred, of Austin, Texas, at a reception for Seton Hill University's MFA in Popular Fiction program, held Jna. 9 at the university's Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
From left: Author Gretchen McNeil joins Susan Jessen of Painesville, Ohio, and Jeni Fred, of Austin, Texas, at a reception for Seton Hill University's MFA in Popular Fiction program, held Jna. 9 at the university's Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
From left: Derek McElfresh and Sarah McElfresh, both of Silverton, Okla., and Kate Surles of Accokeek, Md., wait to have books signed by author Gretchen McNeil, during a reception for Seton Hill University's MFA in Popular Fiction program, held Jan. 9 at the university's Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
From left: Derek McElfresh and Sarah McElfresh, both of Silverton, Okla., and Kate Surles of Accokeek, Md., wait to have books signed by author Gretchen McNeil, during a reception for Seton Hill University's MFA in Popular Fiction program, held Jan. 9 at the university's Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
From left: Jennifer Cilia of Pittsburgh, Storm Navarro of San Marcos, Texas, Briana Smith of Alexandria, Va., and Ali Gipson of Pittsburgh attended a reception for Seton Hill University's MFA in Popular Fiction program, held Jan. 9  at the university's Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
From left: Jennifer Cilia of Pittsburgh, Storm Navarro of San Marcos, Texas, Briana Smith of Alexandria, Va., and Ali Gipson of Pittsburgh attended a reception for Seton Hill University's MFA in Popular Fiction program, held Jan. 9 at the university's Performing Arts Center in Greensburg.

The Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center in Greensburg has hosted many diverse events, including ballets and operas, but the Jan. 9 talk on a Lifetime TV horror film was a first. Seton Hill's Writing Popular Fiction graduate program hosted young adult suspense writer Gretchen McNeil for “Killing It With Words,” a lecture on her path from unknown novelist to source creator of the television movie “Ten: Murder Island.”

McNeil is no stranger to concert halls, having begun her professional career as an opera and circus performer.

Pop fiction program director Nicole Peeler introduced McNeil, who touched on the pros and cons of writing with a film in mind, the realities of optioning one's work and a few insider stories from the making of the film.

McNeil's latest book, “#MurderTrending,” will be released in 2018. When asked why she embraced young adult horror, McNeil said she read horror as a teenager, and she wanted to make sure there were still thrilling and scary options in an era “where vampires are boyfriends and werewolves are sexy.”

A post-lecture reception and book-signing followed, coordinated by Wendy Lynn, Katya Shaffer and Alicia DiPaolo.

Seen: Albert Wendland, Michael Arnzen, Anne Harris, Derek andSarah McElfresh, Kate Surles, Heidi Ruby Miller, Jason Jack Miller, Lee Tobin McClain, Victor Cypert, George Galuschak, L.J. Longo, Ashley Stern, Tacoma Tomilson, Jeremiah Cook, Lucas Click, Cathy Matuszak, Dana Jackson, Michael Roby, Felicia Kissel and Kali Dedominicis.

Greg Kerestan is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me