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Out & About

Out & About: Saint Vincent celebrates Chinese New Year

Shirley McMarlin
| Monday, Feb. 19, 2018, 7:27 a.m.
Qianqian Wang, a Chinese teacher working at Valley School of Ligonier, performs a traditional dance during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Qianqian Wang, a Chinese teacher working at Valley School of Ligonier, performs a traditional dance during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Doreen Blandino, (from left) the chair of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages at Saint Vincent College, Ying Xiao, the Chinese director of the Asian Studies Center of the University of Pittsburgh, and Tina Johnson, director of Chinese studies at Saint Vincent College, pose for a photo during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Doreen Blandino, (from left) the chair of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages at Saint Vincent College, Ying Xiao, the Chinese director of the Asian Studies Center of the University of Pittsburgh, and Tina Johnson, director of Chinese studies at Saint Vincent College, pose for a photo during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Emma Diianni, 11, (left) Mackenzie Springer, 10, and Brooklyn Springer, 8, get instruction on how to create their own Chinese paper cuttings from Ruiqi Huang, a Chinese teacher who works at Serra Catholic High School in McKeesport, during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Emma Diianni, 11, (left) Mackenzie Springer, 10, and Brooklyn Springer, 8, get instruction on how to create their own Chinese paper cuttings from Ruiqi Huang, a Chinese teacher who works at Serra Catholic High School in McKeesport, during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Students from the University of Pittsburgh Greensburg perform a traditional Kungfu fan dance during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Students from the University of Pittsburgh Greensburg perform a traditional Kungfu fan dance during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Saint Vincent College student Nicolas Pe, dons a stuffed dog atop his hat to represent the Year of the Dog as students from the college put on a performance explaining the history of the Chinese calendar during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Saint Vincent College student Nicolas Pe, dons a stuffed dog atop his hat to represent the Year of the Dog as students from the college put on a performance explaining the history of the Chinese calendar during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Saint Vincent College Students put on a performance explaining the history of the Chinese calendar through use of animal costumes during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Saint Vincent College Students put on a performance explaining the history of the Chinese calendar through use of animal costumes during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Middle school students from Valley School of Ligonier perform a traditional Chinese dance during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Middle school students from Valley School of Ligonier perform a traditional Chinese dance during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Ying Xiao pours traditional Chinese teas for guests during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Ying Xiao pours traditional Chinese teas for guests during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Qianqian Wang, a Chinese teacher working at Valley School of Ligonier, instructs young kids on how to create Chinese letters during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Qianqian Wang, a Chinese teacher working at Valley School of Ligonier, instructs young kids on how to create Chinese letters during the annual Chinese New Year celebration at Saint Vincent College on Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018 in Latrobe.

According to the Chinese zodiac, it's the Year of the Dog.

If you were born in a dog year, you are loyal, honest and can keep a secret — but sometimes you worry too much.

Dogs and the other 11 animals of the zodiac got their due during a Chinese New Year celebration on Feb. 13 at Saint Vincent College.

The evening began with entertainment by students from Saint Vincent, Pitt-Greensburg, Valley School of Ligonier, Cardinal Maida Academy and Bishop McCourt Catholic High School, along with their Chinese language teachers.

The songs, a skit about the zodiac and kung fu fan dances were introduced in both Chinese and English by Barbara Wang and Madisen Bellon.

Following was a buffet of noodles, chicken and rice, almond cookies, tea and more, along with a program of cultural activities.

Visitors could observe a Chinese tea ceremony or try their own hands at ping-pong, paper-cutting, calligraphy, opera mask-painting and even hacky sack.

The annual event is organized by Saint Vincent professors Doreen Blandino and Tina Johnson and is sponsored by the Saint Vincent James and Margaret Tseng Loe China Studies Center and the Pitt-Greensburg Confucius Classroom .

Seen woofing it up: Suzanne English, Jim and Ginny Barnett, Deanne Reese, Christa Reese, Mike Markosky and daughter Maggie, Cheryl Wood, Anna Coletti, Lindsey Izzo, Gene Forbes, Pat Hubert, Keith and Rebekah Daugherty with sonGreyson, Jim andBeth Hamerski with sonLex and John Egbert andNaomi Bailey with daughterRiley Joy Egbert.

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5750, smcmarlin@tribweb.com or via Twitter @shirley_trib.

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