Out & About: Bushy Run car cruise a lesson in automotive history | TribLIVE.com
Out & About

Out & About: Bushy Run car cruise a lesson in automotive history

Shirley McMarlin

Visitors to Bushy Run Battlefield usually learn a particular kind of history. The 213-acre Penn Township historical complex was the site of a 1763 battle between British soldiers and Native Americans warriors during Pontiac’s Rebellion.

On July 6, visitors got a snapshot of the history of the automobile during the ninth annual Classic Car Cruise hosted by the Bushy Run Battlefield Heritage Society.

Coming from far and wide were all kinds of wheeled vehicles, from early examples of the horseless carriage to modern muscle cars also destined to become classics.

“There are some magnificent cars here today,” said volunteer Rob Malloy, adding that society members hoped the cruise would draw new visitors who might not have been familiar with the site or its history. Proceeds are marked for operations and programming.

Every car owner had a story to share, and here are just a few:

Not many people have heard of the long-defunct Graham-Paige automobile company, so Don Adams of Harrison City was at Bushy Run to educate them.

Adams bought his 1941 Graham Hollywood in 2010 off of eBay from a seller in Arizona — in rougher shape than he had been led to believe.

It was basically just a body full of holes that had been filled with chicken wire and putty — no frame, no engine, no windows: “It came off the car carrier tied together with bull rope.”

Still in the process of restoration, Adams says, the matte black sedan “attracts attention everywhere I go.”

• Art Comer bought his bright blue 1964 Ford Fairlane 500 in 1966 when he got out of high school. It was his everyday driver for a while, then went into storage. It was a dragster in the 1970s and ’80s, but now it’s back on the street.

“I lost a lot of women over the years, but I still have the car,” Comer says.

• Mitchell Dolney of North Huntingdon tooled up in an all-original, orange 1975 Honda Civic.

“From day one, the Civic was an economy car that people drove to death, so you don’t see them much any more,” he said. “When people see it, they like to share their own memories of Civics they had.”

Bought in Cleveland, Dolney’s Civic bears an old student parking sticker from Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo.

One thing that drew Jim and Candy Jones to their 2006 Ford Mustang was its bright red paint job.

“It’s just so pretty,” Candy Jones said.

The Penn Township couple bought the ’Stang in March. Their “pleasure car” comes out on nice days, often for a trip to the golf course. Luckily, the trunk is big enough to hold two golf bags.

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, [email protected] or via Twitter .


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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Jim Jones, of Penn Township talks to Kenny Benson of Penn Township about his 1948 Harley Davidson Servi-Car during the Bushy Run Battlefield ninth annual Classic Car Cruise held at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township on Saturday afternoon, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Don Adams of Harrison City and his Standard Poodle, “Charlie”, relax in front of his 1941 Graham Hollywood during the Bushy Run Battlefield ninth annual Classic Car Cruise held at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township on Saturday afternoon, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Norman England of Penn Hills looks at a 1964 Ford Fairlane 500, owned by Art Comer, during the Bushy Run Battlefield ninth annual Classic Car Cruise held at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township on Saturday afternoon, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Debbie Yutzy of North Huntingdon and Juli Snyder of North Versailles look at the cars during the Bushy Run Battlefield ninth annual Classic Car Cruise held at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township on Saturday afternoon, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Jon and Dee Johnston, both of Penn Township, dance to the oldies music playing during the Bushy Run Battlefield ninth annual Classic Car Cruise held at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township on Saturday afternoon, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
John Papai of Level Green takes a look inside a 1954 Ford F100, owned by Don Daw, during the Bushy Run Battlefield ninth annual Classic Car Cruise held at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township on Saturday afternoon, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Classic cars, trucks and motorcycles are exhibited during the Bushy Run Battlefield ninth annual Classic Car Cruise held at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township on Saturday afternoon, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Rick Volpatti of New Alexandria stands with his 1967 427 Cobra during the Bushy Run Battlefield ninth annual Classic Car Cruise held at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township on Saturday afternoon, July 6, 2019.
Categories: Lifestyles | OutAndAbout
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