Out & About: Greensburg exhibit puts new twist on traditional ‘womanly arts’ | TribLIVE.com
Out & About

Out & About: Greensburg exhibit puts new twist on traditional ‘womanly arts’

Shirley McMarlin
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Participants Gloria Gonzalez of Greensburg, Darlene Upson of Latrobe, Pamela Cooper of Greensburg and Maryanne Moyer of New Alexandria in front of the multi-artist “Rust Away” project at a Sept. 11 reception for “The Art of Woman” show at the Greensburg Garden and Civic Center.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Exhibiting artist Mary Ellen Raneri (right) of Latrobe with her husband, Phil Raneri, at the Sept. 11 reception for “The Art of Woman” show at the Greensburg Garden and Civic Center.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Exhibiting artist Raven Cintron (right) and Jeff Donato, both of Ligonier, at the Sept. 11 reception for “The Art of Woman,” running through Sept. 30 at the Greensburg Garden and Civic Center.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Helen Sitter of Ligonier, in front of her portrait made by Mary Ellen Raneri, at the Sept. 11 reception for “The Art of Woman” exhibition in the Greensburg Garden and Civic Cente.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Joann Lightner of Greensburg, Cindy Wells of Jeannette, Jamye Timms of Mt. Pleasant and Robyn Henry of Greensburg replicate the painting, “To Darlene,” (at back) by exhibiting artist Mary Ellen Raneri at a Sept. 11 reception for “The Art of Woman” in the Greensburg Garden and Civic Center.

An art show that is “a testimony to the strength, work, voice and beauty of all women” is on display through Sept. 30 in the Greensburg Garden and Civic Center.

Appropriately titled “The Art of Woman,” the exhibition features 35 pieces by Mary Ellen Raneri of Latrobe and Raven Cintron of Ligonier.

Among the works is a three-part fabric sculpture that Raneri envisioned and brought to life in collaboration with Cintron and 13 other women. “We Will Not Rust Away” was created by wrapping wet pieces of white cloth around rusted metal objects, so the rust would seep into the fabric and create designs.

The individual pieces were later unwrapped and sewn together into three large wall hangings, with each woman adding an affirmation to her pieces.

Attendees at a Sept. 11 reception read the phrase “I will not rust because…” completed with messages like, “I am precious stone,” “I’m too stubborn” and “I stopped crying.”

In a sly nod to traditional views of women, Raneri said, the pieces were hung with wooden clothespins.

Along with the “Rust” piece, Raneri is showing a number of paintings. Cintron is showing her fiber pieces via the traditional “womanly arts”of quilting, embroidery, crochet and beadwork.

Seen at the reception: Phil Raneri, Jaime and April Cintron, Jeff Donato, Joann Lightner, Cindy Wells, Jamye Timms, Robyn Henry, Bree Fox, Enso Forge, Tara Hassler, Johnny Santoro, Jim Simco, Barbara Ferrier, Annie Urban, David Steimer, Pamela Cooper, Maryanne Moyer, Gloria Gonzalez, Kim Rentler and Patricia Elliot-Rentler.

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Lifestyles | OutAndAbout
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