Out & About: NAACP human rights banquet calls for justice, equality | TribLIVE.com
Out & About

Out & About: NAACP human rights banquet calls for justice, equality

Shirley McMarlin
946638_web1_gtr-OA-rights5-040819
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
From left: Denise Holmes, event co-chair, Terrell Thomas, keynote speaker, American Civil Liberties Union, and Ruth Tolbert, event co-chair and branch president, gather for a photo April 6 during the Greensburg-Jeannette NAACP 2019 Annual Human Rights Banquet at the Greensburg Country Club.
946638_web1_gtr-OA-rights4-040819
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Sister Lois Sculco (left), 2019 Community Service Award recipient, and Ruth Woods, 2019 Branch Merit Award recipient, pose April 6 for a photo during the Greensburg-Jeannette NAACP 2019 Annual Human Rights Banquet at the Greensburg Country Club.
946638_web1_gtr-OA-rights3-040819
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
N’Dia Smith (left) of Derry, 2019 College Graduate Honoree Award recipient, and Delilah Henry, a senior at Hempfield Area High School and the 2019 Student Honoree WIN Scholarship Award recipient, pose for a photo April 6 during the Greensburg-Jeannette NAACP 2019 Annual Human Rights Banquet at the Greensburg Country Club.
946638_web1_gtr-OA-rights2-040819
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
NAACP Youth Council Special Recognition recipients Zen Scott-Mighty (left), a sophomore at Greensburg Salem High School, and Olivia Meadows, an eighth-grade student at Latrobe Junior High School, pose for a photo April 6 during the Greensburg-Jeannette NAACP 2019 Annual Human Rights Banquet at the Greensburg Country Club.
946638_web1_gtr-OA-rights1-040819
Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Tonuia Smith (left) and Norma Skillings, both of Greensburg, pose for a photo April 6 during the Greensburg-Jeannette NAACP 2019 Annual Human Rights Banquet at the Greensburg Country Club.

“Moving Forward Together for Justice and Equality” was the theme of the annual Greensburg-Jeannette NAACP Human Rights Banquet, held April 6 in the Greensburg Country Club.

“We are living in a time that challenges all of us,” branch President Ruth Tolbert said in program remarks, adding that local NAACP branch members are “steadfast in our resolve and immovable from our objective” of standing for political, educational, social and economic equality for all, along with the elimination of racial discrimination and hatred.

The annual event recognizes people from different stages of life and spheres of influence who uphold those ideals.

This year’s honorees: Community Service Award, Sister Lois Sculco of the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill; Branch Merit Award, Ruth Woods; College Graduate Award, N’Dia Smith, a recent graduate of Howard University; Women in NAACP Scholarship Award, Delilah Henry, a Hempfield Area High School senior; and NAACP Youth Council Special Recognition, Zen Scott-Mighty, a Greensburg-Salem High School sophomore, and Olivia Meadows, a Greater Latrobe Junior High eighth-grader.

Speaker was Terrell Thomas, a senior field organizer for the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania’s Smart Justice Campaign in Allegheny County.

The Rev. Roy Aiken provided invocation and benediction, while Gabrielle Skillings served as emcee. Denise Holmes co-chaired the event with Tolbert.

Seen: Adrienne Russell, Jerry and Norma Skillings, Jim Galik and Jean Slusser, Terri Bundridge, Carlotta Paige, Althea Wright, Marilyn Fox Lewis, Ron and Carlene Williams, Ernest and Evelyn Horton, Troy Ross, Sheila Confer, Ann Emmerling, Tracy Scott-Mighty, Diane Meadows, Barbara Ferrier, Laneka Hainesworth, Imogene Cathey and Debra Mason.

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Lifestyles | OutAndAbout
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.