Out & About: Native America comedy group melds cynicism, satire | TribLIVE.com
Out & About

Out & About: Native America comedy group melds cynicism, satire

Shirley McMarlin
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Jack Wood (left) and Keith Kelly, both of Hempfield, pose for a photo April 12 during Art on Tap 2.0 at The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
From lef: Donna Sheridan of Greensburg, Beverly Sarp of Greensburg and Helen Bush of Delmont gather for a photo April 12 during Art on Tap 2.0 at The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
From left: Mark Barill of Southwest Greensburg joins Mary and John Campfield of Greensburg for a photo April 12 during Art on Tap 2.0 at The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Josh and Kary Milan of Milanscape, the Art on Tap 2.0 sponsor, pose for a photo April 12 during the event at The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
The 1491s Native American comedy sketch group — (from left) Dallas Goldtooth, Bobby Wilson and Ryan Redcorn — talk to guests while touring the exhibit Mingled Visions: The Photographs of Edward S. Curtis and Will Wilson, during Art on Tap 2.0, held April 12 at The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.

The 1491s sketch comedy group describes themselves as a “gaggle of Indians chock full of cynicism and splashed with a good dose of indigenous satire.”

Their name obviously refers to the year prior to Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the New World and the advent of European colonization.

Nothing is sacred when they take the stage, as members Dallas Goldtooth, Bobby Wilson and Ryan Redcorn did April 12 for an appearance at Art on Tap 2.0 in The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.

The performance was part of special programming in conjunction with “Mingled Visions,” an exhibition of historical and contemporary photographs and other works portraying Native Americans running through June 30.

The self-described “group of indigenous misfits” hailing from the wooded ghettos of Minnesota and buffalo grass of Oklahoma started making YouTube videos in 2009 and has branched out to live shows, panel discussions and other events around the globe.

Alternating videos with live sketches, the 1491s lampooned everything from hipster Indian wannabes and tacky souvenir shops to buffalo hunts and a sweat lodge ceremony that turns into a passive-aggressive prayer contest between an ex-husband and a new boyfriend.

No one and nothing goes unskewered — but the 1491s do it with such a light touch that you might not even notice the jabs.

Seen at The Westmoreland: Sally Loughran, Jim and Kathy Longacre, Barbara Ferrier, Gene James, Josh and Kary Milan, Joan McGarry, Keith and Shirleah Kelly, Erica Nuckles and Drue Spallholz.

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Lifestyles | OutAndAbout
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