Out & About: No ifs, ands or butts — goat yoga benefit sells out | TribLIVE.com
Out & About

Out & About: No ifs, ands or butts — goat yoga benefit sells out

Shirley McMarlin

People practice yoga not only for the physical benefits, like increased strength and flexibility, but also for the mental and emotional health benefits — like a sense of calm and relaxation and a deeper mind-body connection.

So who thought Goat Yoga would be a good idea?

Goats aren’t exactly known for being chill, but goat yoga has become popular in recent years, since an Oregon farmer (and goat owner) and her yoga instructor came up with the idea.

Goat yoga came to Petland Norwin in North Huntingdon on July 6, as a fundraiser for the Yukon-based Pet Adoption League.

Goat owner and PAL manager Jo Smith supplied three mama Nigerian dwarf goats and nine kids for the event. Helping to wrangle them were volunteers April Steele, Tara Ford and Julie Hillwig.

The goats made themselves right at home in Petland’s doggy daycare area, frolicking and nuzzling up to about 40 yoga participants.

It’s hard to do a downward- facing dog when a goat is investigating your mat or trying to eat your shirt. So, it might not have been the most zen experience, but it sure was a lot of fun.

“I don’t like yoga,” said participant Stephanie Vozar of North Huntingdon. “I came strictly for the goats.”

Also coming for the goats were April Morrison, Kieren Morrison, Robin Vanestenberg, Chelsea Korber, Britney Zwergel, Rachelle Rush, Ashley Hayden, Michelle Andrykovitch, Christy Wichelmann, Savanna Wichelmann, Tammi Chunko, Jennifer D’Amico, Katie Kolcek, Amy McConnell and Gretchen Karcher, mother of Petland owners Kurt Karcher and Ted Karcher.

Instructor was Siobhan Sickels of Pittsburgh, with Arbonne International, a natural products marketing company that also does wellness and workout events for local charities.

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, [email protected] or via Twitter .


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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Ashley Hayden of Irwin is admired by a Nigerian dwarf goat kid during goat yoga to benefit the Pet Adoption League held at Petland Norwin in North Huntingdon on Saturday evening, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
A couple of Nigerian dwarf goat kids join (from left) Beth Bliss of Level Green, Phyllis Atwater of Irwin and Kate Atwater of Level Green during goat yoga to benefit the Pet Adoption League held at Petland Norwin in North Huntingdon on Saturday evening, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Jennifer D’Amico of North Huntingdon interacts with the Nigerian dwarf goat kids during goat yoga to benefit the Pet Adoption League held at Petland Norwin in North Huntingdon on Saturday evening, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Co-owner of Petland Norwin Kurt Karcher, goat owner and Pet Adoption League shelter manager Jo Smith and yoga instructor Siobhan Sickels hold Nigerian Dwarf goat kids while posing for a photo during goat yoga to benefit the Pet Adoption League held at Petland Norwin in North Huntingdon on Saturday evening, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Nigerian dwarf goats mingle around during goat yoga to benefit the Pet Adoption League held at Petland Norwin in North Huntingdon on Saturday evening, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
Kieren Morrison, 11, of Westmoreland City is entertained by Nigerian dwarf goats during goat yoga to benefit the Pet Adoption League held at Petland Norwin in North Huntingdon on Saturday evening, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Lynne Bertok and Lisa Steinkopf, both of North Huntingdon, cuddle with Nigerian dwarf goat kids during goat yoga, to benefit the Pet Adoption League held at Petland Norwin in North Huntingdon on Saturday evening, July 6, 2019.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
April Steele, office staff at Pet Adoption League, poses for a photo with one of the goats during goat yoga to benefit the Pet Adoption League held at Petland Norwin in North Huntingdon on Saturday evening, July 6, 2019.
Categories: Lifestyles | OutAndAbout
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