Out & About: WCCC art students show work at capstone exhibitions | TribLIVE.com
Out & About

Out & About: WCCC art students show work at capstone exhibitions

Shirley McMarlin
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Exhibiting artists Daniel Fedinick of Greensburg, Erica Blank of Trafford and Casey Madera of Lower Burrell at the opening reception of their Associate of Fine Arts Capstone Student Exhibition, on April 10 in the Westmoreland County Community College Science Hall Art Gallery on the Youngwood campus.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Beth Patterson of Penn Township, Anthony Johnson of Harrison City and Bobbi Faulk-Johnson of Harrison City visit the opening reception for a Associate of Fine Arts Capstone Student Exhibition held April 10 in the Westmoreland County Community College Science Hall Art Gallery on the Youngwood campus.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Gallery director and Capstone class instructor Christine Kocevar, set design instructor Sam Lantz, art therapy instructor Kristy Waller and associate professor Kathy Dlugos attend the opening reception of an Associate of Fine Arts Capstone Student Exhibition, held April 10 in the Westmoreland County Community College Science Hall Art Gallery on the Youngwood campus.
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Kim Stepinsky | For the Tribune-Review
(From left) Ian Darragh of Delmont and Connor Adair of Mt. Lebanon visit the opening reception of an Associate of Fine Arts Capstone Student Exhibition on April 10 in the Westmoreland County Community College Science Hall Art Gallery on the Youngwood campus.

In architectural terms, the capstone is the final stone placed at the top of a building or a monument. In education, a capstone project (sometimes called a senior project or thesis) is a multifaceted course that integrates a student’s cumulative learning experience.

At Westmoreland County Community College, associate of fine arts students in their final semester participate in a Capstone class during which they “get ready to go on to their next step,” according to instructor Christine Kocevar, by creating artwork, working on portfolios, websites and resumes, and — perhaps most importantly — planning and hanging an exhibition, complete with opening reception, in the Science Hall art gallery on the Youngwood campus.

This spring, there are four exhibitions of works in various media, with two already completed and two yet to come.

The work of Austin Lintelman and Kae Spiering was displayed April 1-5, and the work of Erica Blank, Daniel Fedinick and Casey Madera followed from April 8-12.

Still to come are exhibits by Rain McCoy and Stephanie Oplinger, April 22-26, with a reception 6-8 p.m. April 24; and Sandra Buerklin and Amber Miller, April 29-May 3, with a reception 6-8 p.m. May 1.

The free receptions are open to the public.

At the April 10 reception organized by Blank, Fedinick and Madera, associate art professor Kathy Dlugos said WCCC art students get “a four-year program concentrated in two years. It’s unheard of at other schools for second-year students to get an exhibition. The rigor of learning it takes to put up a show puts them ahead of others.”

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Lifestyles | OutAndAbout
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