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Allegheny

Dressing to the nines doesn't cost a dime at annual prom gown giveaway

Tony LaRussa
| Saturday, March 3, 2018, 5:24 p.m.
Kirsha Awkward, 17, who attends Brashear High School in the city's Beechview neighborhood, tries on a prom gown at the Project Prom Gown Giveaway event at Thriftique in Lawrenceville on Saturday, March 3, 2018.
Tony LaRussa | Tribune-Review
Kirsha Awkward, 17, who attends Brashear High School in the city's Beechview neighborhood, tries on a prom gown at the Project Prom Gown Giveaway event at Thriftique in Lawrenceville on Saturday, March 3, 2018.
Lynette Lederman of the National Council of Jewish Women checks out one of the 2,000 new gowns available at no cost to girls who can't afford an outfit for the prom. This is the second year the womens' group has teamed with Allegheny County for Project Prom Gown Giveaway. The even was held Saturday, March 3, 2018.
Tony LaRussa | Tribune-Review
Lynette Lederman of the National Council of Jewish Women checks out one of the 2,000 new gowns available at no cost to girls who can't afford an outfit for the prom. This is the second year the womens' group has teamed with Allegheny County for Project Prom Gown Giveaway. The even was held Saturday, March 3, 2018.
Sisters Anne Girton, 16, and Gabi Girton, 17, of Shaler tried on a number of gowns before finding just the right ones to wear to the prom during the Project Prom Gown Giveaway on Saturday, March 3, 2018, in Lawrenceville
Tony LaRussa | Tribune-Review
Sisters Anne Girton, 16, and Gabi Girton, 17, of Shaler tried on a number of gowns before finding just the right ones to wear to the prom during the Project Prom Gown Giveaway on Saturday, March 3, 2018, in Lawrenceville
Girls attending the prom gown giveaway event at the Thriftique shop in Lawrenceville on Saturday, March 3, 2018, were able to accessorize their outfits with fancy costume jewelry and other items.
Tony LaRussa | Tribune-Review
Girls attending the prom gown giveaway event at the Thriftique shop in Lawrenceville on Saturday, March 3, 2018, were able to accessorize their outfits with fancy costume jewelry and other items.
Jessica Freudon, 17, of Munhall was elated to get a free powder-blue gown on Saturday, March 3, 2018 for her prom in June at the Lincoln Park Performing Arts Charter School.
Tony LaRussa | Tribune-Review
Jessica Freudon, 17, of Munhall was elated to get a free powder-blue gown on Saturday, March 3, 2018 for her prom in June at the Lincoln Park Performing Arts Charter School.
Girls attending the Project Prom Gown Giveway on Saturday, March 3, 2018, were able to complete their outfits with a pair of new shoes for the social event of the year at their schools.
Tony LaRussa | Tribune-Review
Girls attending the Project Prom Gown Giveway on Saturday, March 3, 2018, were able to complete their outfits with a pair of new shoes for the social event of the year at their schools.
Some of the fancier shoes available at the Project Prom Gown Giveaway were put out for dispaly on Saturday, March 3, 2018.
Tony LaRussa | Tribune-Review
Some of the fancier shoes available at the Project Prom Gown Giveaway were put out for dispaly on Saturday, March 3, 2018.

Every teenage girl wants to look her very best when she goes to the prom.

But the cost of a getting a stylish evening dress with the shoes and accessories that go along can be a real budget buster.

To help make prom night a reality for people in need, a local nonprofit organization has teamed with the Allegheny County Department of Human Services to help girls dress up for the social event of the year at their schools.

“There are many families in the community who don't have the resources to pay for their kids to attend the prom,” said Lynette Lederman of the National Council of Jewish Women, which operates the Thriftique thrift shop in Lawrenceville. “Some kids don't go to the prom simply because they can't afford it, which can sometimes be humiliating for them.”

On Saturday, the first of several Project Prom Gown Giveaway events was held at Thriftique, where girls could select from nearly 2,000 new gowns and party dresses that have been donated by local clothiers.

“There's a lot of siblings in my family, so it would be really difficult for me to be able to buy a gown for the prom,” said Jessica Freudon, 17, of Munhall, who attends the Lincoln Park Performing Arts Charter School in Midland, Beaver County. “I'm really excited that I was able to get such a beautiful dress and everything else I need to go along with it.”

Four more gown giveaway events are scheduled in the next week.

Tony LaRussa is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-772-6368 or tlarussa@tribweb.com or via Twitter @TonyLaRussaTrib.

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