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'Jar Kitty': Team rescues cat found with jar stuck on its head in South Park

Brian C. Rittmeyer
| Friday, March 16, 2018, 3:36 p.m.
A cat with a plastic jar stuck on its head hides in a South Park neighborhood. It was later captured, treated and is now in foster care awaiting adoption.
Homeless Cat Management Team
A cat with a plastic jar stuck on its head hides in a South Park neighborhood. It was later captured, treated and is now in foster care awaiting adoption.
The rescued cat was suffering from an ear infection and was infested with fleas.
Homeless Cat Management Team
The rescued cat was suffering from an ear infection and was infested with fleas.
After initially being called 'Jar Kitty,' the male feline was given the name 'Binks,' from the Star Wars character 'Jar Jar Binks.'
Homeless Cat Management Team
After initially being called 'Jar Kitty,' the male feline was given the name 'Binks,' from the Star Wars character 'Jar Jar Binks.'
Now in a foster home, Binks was found to be friendly enough to be suitable for adoption.
Homeless Cat Management Team
Now in a foster home, Binks was found to be friendly enough to be suitable for adoption.

A cat found with a jar stuck on its head is now recovering in a foster home.

The Homeless Cat Management Team this week was asked to help the cat, seen in a South Park neighborhood with a jar stuck on its head.

According to the team's Facebook page , they jumped into action, and set up a trap to get it. The cat had been hiding under a shed.

The cat was able to breathe, but if not caught and freed from the jar, was at risk of dying from dehydration and starvation.

"After a couple hours, the kitty came out from under the shed and was trapped!" the group said in a post.

The cat was taken to Companions First Veterinary Clinic for care. The jar was plastic, so it was cut and taken off.

"He was so brave we didn't have to sedate him," Melisa Tush Cardillo said.

"Jar Kitty," as he was being called, was given the name "Binks," for the Star Wars character " Jar Jar Binks ."

The name Mason was already taken, said Berndatte Kazmarski, a volunteer with the team.

The cat is a male, believed to be four-to-five months old, said Margo Cicci, vice president of the Homeless Cat Management Team board.

He was found to be friendly, if a bit shy. He was suffering from an ear infection and was infested with fleas, but was said to be doing well.

"He's not super friendly yet. He still needs some socialization," Cicci said. "He's a little scared, but he's not truly feral."

Binks has been neutered, and placed in a foster home.

"He's adjusting well in foster so it looks as if he's friendly enough to be adopted soon," Kazmarski said.

When Binks is ready for adoption, information will be posted on the Pittsburgh Cat Adoption Team's Facebook page , Cicci said.

Those interested in adopting Binks can pre-apply, she said.

Brian C. Rittmeyer is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-226-4701, brittmeyer@tribweb.com or on Twitter @BCRittmeyer.

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