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Zombie night out in Pittsburgh for 'Night of the Living Dead' 50th anniversary

| Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, 6:57 a.m.
Allie Lampman of Knoxville and Matt Limegrover of Verona, dressed as zombies, stand for a photo during the 'Rooftop Shindig: Night of the Living Dead' event on the top of the Theater Square Garage on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Allie Lampman of Knoxville and Matt Limegrover of Verona, dressed as zombies, stand for a photo during the 'Rooftop Shindig: Night of the Living Dead' event on the top of the Theater Square Garage on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018.
Scrap metal and found objects artist David Calfo of Lawrenceville is seen through the window of his reconstructed hearse during the 'Rooftop Shindig: Night of the Living Dead' event on the top of the Theater Square Garage on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Scrap metal and found objects artist David Calfo of Lawrenceville is seen through the window of his reconstructed hearse during the 'Rooftop Shindig: Night of the Living Dead' event on the top of the Theater Square Garage on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018.
Rafiq Payne of Stanton Heights (far left) takes a selfie with zombies  Tonya Sand (from left), Matt Limegrover of Verona and Allie Lampman of Knoxville during the 'Rooftop Shindig: Night of the Living Dead' event on the top of the Theater Square Garage on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Rafiq Payne of Stanton Heights (far left) takes a selfie with zombies Tonya Sand (from left), Matt Limegrover of Verona and Allie Lampman of Knoxville during the 'Rooftop Shindig: Night of the Living Dead' event on the top of the Theater Square Garage on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018.
Tonya Sand of Ross, dressed as a zombie, stands for a photo during the 'Rooftop Shindig: Night of the Living Dead' event on the top of the Theater Square Garage on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Tonya Sand of Ross, dressed as a zombie, stands for a photo during the 'Rooftop Shindig: Night of the Living Dead' event on the top of the Theater Square Garage on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018.
Tonya Sand of Ross, dressed as a zombie, stands for a photo during the 'Rooftop Shindig: Night of the Living Dead' event on the top of the Theater Square Garage on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Tonya Sand of Ross, dressed as a zombie, stands for a photo during the 'Rooftop Shindig: Night of the Living Dead' event on the top of the Theater Square Garage on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018.

Zombies invaded Downtown Pittsburgh Tuesday night to celebrate the 50th anniversary of George Romero’s movie, “Night of the Living Dead.”

A screening of the cult film atop the Theater Square Garage was the marquee attraction at the Rooftop Shindig co-sponsored by The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership, Pittsburgh Filmmakers and The Scarehouse.

“One of our goals is to activate spaces that aren’t used during typical events,” says Delaney Held, marking and communications coordinator for the PDP. “People came out of the woodwork to tell us how much they loved George Romero.”

Visitors to the free event laid out blankets or set up folding chairs to watch the show while the lights of the city flickered in the background.

Since this year marks the 50th anniversary of Romero’s classic horror flick, the organization wanted to go guts-out and make it a memorable evening.

Cloudy skies didn’t dampen the mood. People congregated on the rooftop to enjoy music from local band Devin Moses and The Undead while enjoying Rouge Dead Guy Ales and Moonlit Zombie cocktails from Ole Smokey Distillery.

Scott Franz of Brentwood came out to enjoy his favorite flick in a unique setting.

“I love zombies, and I love Pittsburgh,” he says, gazing out a the city lights. “I love the makeup, I love the fantasy of something that comes back from the dead.”

Lawrenceville-based artist Dave Celfo brought his converted 1977 Chevy Malibu to the event. Looking like a hearse on steroids, with Zeke and Sons Funeral Parlor stenciled on the doors, the car attracted onlookers, living and dead.

Emporio, a meatball joint, was on hand to dish out delicious, undead-themed eats such as Zombie Ziti, Haunted Hoagies and Blood Splattered Cookies.

Hungry ghouls from The Scarehouse, Pittsburgh’s premiere haunted attraction that opens Friday, lurched and moaned upon the roof. The Etna-based haunted house is partnering with the PDP and the George A. Romero Foundation’s Romero Lives 50th Anniversary Celebration throughout the Halloween season to bring Pittsburghers constant frights.

Starting Oct. 3 and open on select nights through Nov. 3, the Original Oyster House in Market Square will transform into a Zombie Den, where zombie-themed cocktails will be served.

Kristy Locklin is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

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