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Get out your sweaters on 'cardigan day' for Mister Rogers in Pittsburgh

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018, 4:51 p.m.
Fred Rogers and David Newell, as Speedy Delivery's Mr. McFeely, stand on the front porch set while filming an episode of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood.
Thursday is WQED 'Cardigan Day' to honor the late Fred Rogers. The station will set up four locations with sweaters where fans can take a selfie and post it to social media with the hashtag #cardiganday and #sweaterweather.
Ohio University Libraries - Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections
Fred Rogers and David Newell, as Speedy Delivery's Mr. McFeely, stand on the front porch set while filming an episode of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. Thursday is WQED 'Cardigan Day' to honor the late Fred Rogers. The station will set up four locations with sweaters where fans can take a selfie and post it to social media with the hashtag #cardiganday and #sweaterweather.
'Won't You Be My Neighbor' is one of the films at the Pittsburgh International Film Festival in Lawrenceville which begins July 27. The documentary explores how iconic children's television host, the last Fred Rogers, touched the lives of people all over the world. Thursday is WQED 'Cardigan Day' to honor the late Fred Rogers. The station will set up four locations with sweaters where fans can take a selfie and post it to social media with the hashtag #cardiganday and #sweaterweather.
COURTESY PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN'S FILM FESTIVAL
'Won't You Be My Neighbor' is one of the films at the Pittsburgh International Film Festival in Lawrenceville which begins July 27. The documentary explores how iconic children's television host, the last Fred Rogers, touched the lives of people all over the world. Thursday is WQED 'Cardigan Day' to honor the late Fred Rogers. The station will set up four locations with sweaters where fans can take a selfie and post it to social media with the hashtag #cardiganday and #sweaterweather.
Fred Rogers on 'Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood' Thursday is WQED 'Cardigan Day' to honor the late Fred Rogers. The station will set up four locations with sweaters where fans can take a selfie and post it to social media with the hashtag #cardiganday and #sweaterweather.
File
Fred Rogers on 'Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood' Thursday is WQED 'Cardigan Day' to honor the late Fred Rogers. The station will set up four locations with sweaters where fans can take a selfie and post it to social media with the hashtag #cardiganday and #sweaterweather.

Thursday's expected high of 86 isn't exactly perfect sweater weather.

But we're talking cardigans and Mister Rogers here.

As part of WQED Multimedia's celebration of the 50th anniversary of "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood," we're all invited to a virtual "cardigan day" Thursday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Selfie sweater stations will set up at four locations — WQED's offices in Oakland, Schenley Plaza in Oakland, Senator John Heinz History Center in the Strip District and Bakery Square in the East End. Fred Rogers fans can bring their own sweaters or some will be various sizes and colors available. Anthropologie, a store in Bakery Square, Highway Robbery Vintage and Three Rivers Vintage, both from the South Side, are lending out some sweaters.

The photos will post on social media so a virtual cardigan party can spread across neighborhoods – a fitting tribute to a man who welcomed everyone to the neighborhood. The social media hashtags to post under are #cardiganday and #sweaterweather.

The idea came from a team of individuals at WQED, says Sharon Steele, director of corporate support WQED Multimedia. The team can help fit you with a cardigan or provide selfie tips.

"We have had wonderful in-house support as well as support from sponsors," says Steele. "This is another exciting part of the celebration of Mister Rogers.

The idea came about after seeing the huge engagement all over the city throughout the year when we post something about Mister Rogers, Steele says.

"This is a way for everyone to get involved and they don't have to be at one of the four locations. But if they do stop by one of the selfie stations we will have various photo frames to post behind to enhance their picture. Some people have asked us on social media the best place to buy a cardigan."

Rogers might be most recognized by his red cardigan because it is shown on a lot of images of him, but he certainly wore many different hues, says Steele. Many of the sweaters he wore were made by his mother, she says.

The station will be hosting a "Cardigan Party" on Dec. 19 in the Fred Rogers Studio – a much better chance it will be sweater weather.

"Even if it's in the 80s Thursday, it will be still be sweater weather in 'Mister Rogers' Neighborhood,' Steele says. "The sweater definitely was a signature piece for Mister Rogers. It represented him wanting to create a friendly and comfortable space for children viewing the program which the cardigan signified. This day will be about celebrating the spirit and the friendship and the kindness of Mister Rogers throughout some Pittsburgh neighborhoods."

Details: wqed.org/mr-rogers-50

Did you know?

There is a series of web videos being done called "The Sweater Sessions" where local musicians perform the song "Won't You Be My Neighbor" wearing sweaters.

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib

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