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Allegheny

Redevelopment of former Hazelwood mill site moves forward

Bob Bauder
| Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018, 5:06 p.m.
Rebecca Flora, project director for the former LTV Steel mill property in Pittsburgh’s Hazelwood neighborhood, gives a project update on Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018.
Rebecca Flora, project director for the former LTV Steel mill property in Pittsburgh’s Hazelwood neighborhood, gives a project update on Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018.

Developers of a former LTV Steel plant site in Hazelwood have secured tenants for two buildings going up under the steel skeleton of a former rolling mill on the property and are pushing ahead with construction of a grand plaza and new streets scheduled for completion by next year, officials said Thursday.

Owned by three prominent Pittsburgh foundations, the 178-acre Hazelwood Green property formerly known as Almono is slated for redevelopment as a green, high-tech center with space for housing, offices and recreation. The property is jointly owned by Almono LP, consisting of the Richard King Mellon and Benedum Foundations and the Heinz Endowments.

Rebecca Flora, the project director, and others involved with the development offered a progress update and tours of the site Thursday morning.

“We’re pushing the envelope,” Flora said. “We are doing things that are going to be transformative here because we have the ability to do that in terms of the scale. That means it’s harder because everything we do, including our new street, every step we take, is harder because in some cases nobody’s done it before.”

The Regional Industrial Development Corp, which is developing the former rolling mill known as Mill 19, has signed tenants for two of three buildings currently under construction, according to Emily Sipes, who is in charge of leasing for RIDC. They include Carnegie Mellon University’s Manufacturing Futures Initiative and Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing, a nonprofit closely aligned with CMU, in one of the three-story buildings and an unannounced company in the second. Sipes said the company would make an announcement in the near future.

“I can’t tell you, but it’s going to mesh well,” Sipes said. “It’s a high-tech tenant.”

The two buildings are scheduled to open in 2019 and RIDC is seeking an anchor tenant for the third structure planned for underneath the steel skeleton of the former rolling mill.

Almono LP last week issued a request for qualifications from developers to propose ideas for the remainder of the property, Flora said.

Also scheduled for completion in 2019 are two roads and the plaza.

Workers have started excavations for Lytle Street, which will run parallel to existing Blair Street for the length of the property. Both streets currently exist in Hazelwood and will eventually connect to extensions through Hazelwood Green.

Katrina Flora, Rebecca’s daughter and part of the project development team, said the 2.5-acre plaza adjoining the mill building would include a large tree-lined and landscaped lawn, a stage and a feature consisting of large concrete slabs with water flowing over them into a pool.

She said visitors will be able to sit on portions of the slabs that remain dry.

Plans also call for large porch swings that can accommodate more than one person.

Bob Bauder is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Bob at 412-765-2312, bbauder@tribweb.com or via Twitter @bobbauder.

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