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Police museum to open in Washington, D.C. next to memorial wall

Chuck Biedka
| Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018, 3:45 p.m.
Training and handling police dogs is one law enforcement profession.
Training and handling police dogs is one law enforcement profession.
A police officer directs traffic on Hoffmeyer Road near the Vintage Place neighborhood where three deputies and two city officers were shot Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, in Florence, S.C. (AP Photo/Sean Rayford)
A police officer directs traffic on Hoffmeyer Road near the Vintage Place neighborhood where three deputies and two city officers were shot Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, in Florence, S.C. (AP Photo/Sean Rayford)

The National Law Enforcement Museum will open next Saturday in Washington, D.C.

The museum is adjacent to the national police memorial wall honoring officers, troopers and agents who have died in the line of duty, including Lower Burrell Patrolman Derek Kotecki and New Kensington Patrolman Brian Shaw, and many others from Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania.

The museum is at the Motorola Solutions Foundation Building at Judicial Square and 444 E Street, NW. It’s near most of the district and federal courts.

The museum is described as a “walk in the shoes experience” for visitors. For example, they will be able to try handling simulated emergency calls in a 9-1-1 Emergency Ops exhibit, review evidence and see if you can crack the crime in “Take the Case,” and test your decision-making skills in the training simulator, according to spokesman Steve Groeninge.

Want to see G-Man Eliot Ness’ credentials?

Also on display is the U.S. Park Police Eagle One helicopter used to rescue airplane crash survivors from the Potomac River.

The museum describes the many professions collectively under the umbrella as “law enforcement officer.”

It has guides who can answer questions about police issues and address “the grassroots efforts to strengthen relationships between police and the communities they serve,” Groeninger said.

The exhibit, entitled Five Communities, will provide visitors a look at specific programs developed in Cleveland, Dallas, Chicago, Somerville, Mass. and Charleston, S.C.

At Friday’s grand opening, remarks will be given by National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund leadership, former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft, former Philadelphia Police Department Commissioner Charles Ramsey and others.

A video message from former President George W. Bush will also be shown.

Chuck Biedka is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Chuck at 724-226-4711, cbiedka@tribweb.com or via Twitter @ChuckBiedka.

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