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Allegheny

Check out Scene 75 indoor entertainment in Edgewood Towne Center

| Friday, Oct. 12, 2018, 1:33 a.m.
Scene 74 in Edgewood Towne Center.
Scene 74 in Edgewood Towne Center.
Scene 75 boasts more than 120 arcade games, most of which are still under tarps as construction on the entertainment center continues.
Scene 75 boasts more than 120 arcade games, most of which are still under tarps as construction on the entertainment center continues.
Scene 75 has two nine-hole, black light miniature golf courses under its roof, including one with a sea creature theme.
Scene 75 has two nine-hole, black light miniature golf courses under its roof, including one with a sea creature theme.
Scene 75’s two-story laser tag area can host 38 players and two referees for each mission
Scene 75’s two-story laser tag area can host 38 players and two referees for each mission

Paul Kemp is not easily surprised or impressed, a personality quirk that he says agitates his family each Christmas morning.

But the first time he walked into the Scene 75 in Brunswick, Ohio, and turned the corner, revealing 80,000 square feet of games and attractions, he was utterly, honestly stunned.

“Whoa,” is all he could manage.

He hopes guests have a similar reaction when they peek inside Scene 75 indoor entertainment facility in Edgewood Towne Center, where Kemp is the assistant general manager.

Located just off the Parkway East, Scene 75’s newest location inside the old Kmart building is nearly 90,000 square feet and will boast more than 120 deluxe-size arcade games, 12 attractions, three food trucks and a full bar when it opens, likely in November.

“It’s a little bit of everything for all ages under one roof,” Kemp said.

While some of the attractions still need to be built — including a giant inflatables room, a virtual reality area and a 4-D motion theater — most of the arcade games have been placed and some of the guest favorites are ready to go, including a two-story laser tag area painted freehand by a graffiti-style artist. Look closely, and you’ll see several nods to the Steel City.

“This was my special request,” Kemp said, pointing to a river scene on the back wall. “The Roberto Clemente Bridge.”

Also nearly complete are a go-kart track, a “Mission Impossible-style” laser maze, a miniature bowling alley, bumper cars and two black light miniature golf courses.

Scene 75 is pay-as-you-go, with prices starting at 25 cents for an arcade game and topping out at $10 for a 15-minute virtual reality experience.

One of Kemp’s favorite features is the circular bar, which offers parents who choose to relax there a nearly 360 degree view of the Scene 75 floor.

“You can see the whole place and keep an eye on your kids,” Kemp said.

According to General Manager Trent Crytzer, family and service are at the core of the Scene 75 mission. In an effort to spur revitalization, the company typically locates its entertainment centers in long-vacant properties and makes sure a full staff of guest services associates are on the floor at all times, regardless of attendance.

The company also has a record of working with the community. For example, its Learn to Earn and School Grant for Fun programs reward local schoolchildren for academic achievements and good behavior. And the annual Indoor Trick-or-Treat event allows children a safe place to collect Halloween candy.

“It’s a shame we’re not going to open in time for it this year,” Kemp said, “but we’re going to town on it next year.”

April Johnston is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

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