ShareThis Page
Allegheny

Shredding fundraiser planned in memory of Rosenthal brothers

Megan Guza
| Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, 12:36 p.m.
Bob Goldstein, 71, of Squirrel Hill wags his finger at a memorial dedicated to 59-year-old Cecil Rosenthal outside of the Tree of Life Congregation on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. Rosenthal was one of 11 people shot and killed at the synagogue on Saturday. Goldstein has been a member of the congregation since he was born, he said, and knew Rosenthal well. Goldstein’s daughter, Beth Goldstein-Goldman, said Cecil used to wag his finger and say 'You’ve got to go to shul' when he’d see members of the congregation in public. 'Cecil just wanted everyone to go to synagogue. It’s where he found his home. He was just a happy person and wanted everyone to feel that,' Goldstein-Goldman said.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Bob Goldstein, 71, of Squirrel Hill wags his finger at a memorial dedicated to 59-year-old Cecil Rosenthal outside of the Tree of Life Congregation on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. Rosenthal was one of 11 people shot and killed at the synagogue on Saturday. Goldstein has been a member of the congregation since he was born, he said, and knew Rosenthal well. Goldstein’s daughter, Beth Goldstein-Goldman, said Cecil used to wag his finger and say 'You’ve got to go to shul' when he’d see members of the congregation in public. 'Cecil just wanted everyone to go to synagogue. It’s where he found his home. He was just a happy person and wanted everyone to feel that,' Goldstein-Goldman said.

Organizations touched by the lives of Tree of Life shooting victims David and Cecil Rosenthal will hold a document shredding fundraiser in their memory Sunday, officials said Wednesday.

“To know David and Cecil Rosenthal was to know kindness, laughter and joy,” said Lisa Razza, director of communications for ACHIEVA, an organization that works with individuals with disabilities. “They were tragically taken from us, too soon, at the Tree of Life synagogue.”

The Rosenthal brothers were among the 11 killed in the Oct. 27 shooting at Tree of Life in Pittsburgh’s Squirrel Hill.

Through ACHIEVA, Cecil was set to begin working at Iron City Workplace Services, according to the release from Razza.

ACHIEVA and Iron City Workplace Services, along with the nonprofit Friendship Circle, will hold a document-shredding fundraiser in Homestead on Sunday. ICWS offers scanning and shredding services.

Razza said the fundraiser was previously planned but, following the shooting, ICWS owner Phil Sonnenklar asked that the fundraiser be adapted to memorialize David and Cecil — his cousins.

The event will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Waterfront shopping center, in the parking lot between Steak ‘n Shake and First Commonwealth Bank. The minimum donation is $10 per car. Money from the fundraiser will got toward ACHIEVA and Friendship Circle in the name of David and Cecil.

“With the help of staff, family and friends, David and Cecil embraced their community with a love for socializing, exploring and celebrating all events worth celebrating,” Razza said. “The brothers loved their community, living life to the fullest and the community loved them back.”

Megan Guza is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Megan at 412-380-8519, mguza@tribweb.com or via Twitter @meganguzaTrib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me