ShareThis Page
Allegheny

Pittsburgh musicians produce Tree of Life tribute song

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Friday, Nov. 16, 2018, 5:57 p.m.
Joe Wodarek, lead singer with The Stickers country group and guitar band mate Mike Ofca co-wrote the song 'Stand Together' to help create hope and raise money for the Jewish Federation’s Victims of Terror Fund in the wake of the shooting at Tree of Life synagogue. The two enlisted the help of other area musicians on this collaboration.
Randon Bopp Photography
Joe Wodarek, lead singer with The Stickers country group and guitar band mate Mike Ofca co-wrote the song 'Stand Together' to help create hope and raise money for the Jewish Federation’s Victims of Terror Fund in the wake of the shooting at Tree of Life synagogue. The two enlisted the help of other area musicians on this collaboration.
Jeff Jimerson, ofAirborne, joined with fellow musicians, including Joe Wodarek and Mike Ofca of the country band The Stickers, to sing 'Stand Together' a song of hope to help raise money for the Jewish Federation’s Victims of Terror Fund in the wake of the shooting at Tree of Life synagogue.
Randon Bopp Photography
Jeff Jimerson, ofAirborne, joined with fellow musicians, including Joe Wodarek and Mike Ofca of the country band The Stickers, to sing 'Stand Together' a song of hope to help raise money for the Jewish Federation’s Victims of Terror Fund in the wake of the shooting at Tree of Life synagogue.
Clinton Clegg of The Commonheart joined with fellow musicians, including Joe Wodarek and Mike Ofca of the country band The Stickers, to sing 'Stand Together' a song of hope to help raise money for the Jewish Federation’s Victims of Terror Fund in the wake of the shooting at Tree of Life synagogue.
Randon Bopp
Clinton Clegg of The Commonheart joined with fellow musicians, including Joe Wodarek and Mike Ofca of the country band The Stickers, to sing 'Stand Together' a song of hope to help raise money for the Jewish Federation’s Victims of Terror Fund in the wake of the shooting at Tree of Life synagogue.
Scott Blasey of The Clarks joined with fellow musicians, including Joe Wodarek and Mike Ofca of the country band The Stickers, to sing 'Stand Together' a song of hope to help raise money for the Jewish Federation’s Victims of Terror Fund in the wake of the shooting at Tree of Life synagogue.
Randon Bopp Photography
Scott Blasey of The Clarks joined with fellow musicians, including Joe Wodarek and Mike Ofca of the country band The Stickers, to sing 'Stand Together' a song of hope to help raise money for the Jewish Federation’s Victims of Terror Fund in the wake of the shooting at Tree of Life synagogue.

The song was written in a day.

Joe Wodarek, a lead singer for the local band The Stickers, says as fast as he could text other musicians to write a Tree of Life song, the affirmative answers came back. An all-star ensemble of nearly 40 Pittsburgh musicians came together with a message of unity and strength after the Oct. 27 shooting inside Tree of Life Congregation.

“The day after it happened, I knew I wanted to do something,” says Wodarek, a Brookline native, who wrote the song “Stand Together,” with band mate and guitarist Mike Ofca. “I told my wife I needed to do something. ‘Stand Together.’ When you are writing music you try to create a vision and in this song, the vision was clear. Music heals so it was natural just to sit down and start writing. And the song pretty much wrote itself.

“We wanted to offer something to help Pittsburgh heal.”

The response was overwhelming, Wodarek says. Artists of all ages were quick to participate including Scott Blasey of The Clarks, Chris Jamison, runner-upon NBC’s “The Voice,” Joe Grushecky, Hermie Granati, Clinton Clegg of The Commonheart, Jon Belan of “Gene The Werewolf,” Johnny Angel and Bubba of Johnny Angel and the Halos, Edward Gray of the Shondells, Devon Johnson of Ruff Creek, Jeff Jimerson and others.

They recorded the song at Ofca’s studio, Innovation Studios, in Steubenville, Ohio.

“They did a really nice job with the song,” Blasey says. “It’s an amazing song and it holds up in its ability to accommodate a bunch of singers. That’s a tough task when you have a lot of voices. The lyrics are powerful and they hit home. It was a moving experience and I am honored to be a part of it.”

The group will perform “Stand Together” during the 38th annual WPXI Holiday Parade on Nov. 24 in Downtown, Pittsburgh.

“Stand Together” T-shirts are also available for purchase. Proceeds from the shirts and the song, which is available for digital download, will go directly to the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh’s Victims of Terror Fund.

“The musicians in Pittsburgh are a pretty special bunch,” Wodarek says. “I am grateful to know them and to work with them on this song. When we all arrived at the studio we hugged. We all feel this pain.”

Details: http://standtogetherpittsburgh.com

JoAnne Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me