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Carnegie/Bridgeville

Canine Club in Bridgeville looks to rebound following tragic flooding

| Thursday, July 5, 2018, 4:18 p.m.

Teresa Davis just got home from work the night of June 20 when she had to turn right back around. Her Baldwin Street business, like so many others, was taking on water. And fast.

“I'd never seen a flash flood,” she said. “Now I under­stand what a flash flood is.”

Her thoughts immediately went to saving the 15 dogs trapped inside her business The Canine Club, a doggy day care, boarding facility and groomer. Six of those dogs were her own.

Davis said that when she arrived with her husband and son, the floodwater was already 6 feet high. She thought all of the dogs were already gone as the business was silent inside. But as they began treading through the murky water to search the kennels, they started hearing barks and whimpers.

More than 8 feet of floodwater rapidly filled homes and businesses along Baldwin Street following heavy rain. The flooding claimed the life of an Upper St. Clair woman and forced many residents to be rescued by boat.

Some of the animals in the kennel were able to pull themselves onto overturned plastic crates floating in the water. One of the Davises' surviving dogs, Lincoln, was found floating on a couch cushion.

In total, they were able to rescue 10 of the dogs and bring them to safety on the second floor of the building. Five — three of their own and two pets of customers — didn't make it.

“They're devastated, of course,” Davis said of the customers whose pets had died, “but understanding of us and appreciative of what we've tried to do and that it was a freak natural disaster.”

The Canine Club currently is closed for business. The remaining dogs that had not yet been picked up by their owners were moved to The Canine Club's second location — Mutt Manor — in Findlay.

Inside The Canine Club, the walls have been cut open to expose and dry their interiors. Davis said the business opened only four years ago.

It will take time, but Davis said the location will open again for business.

“It was a nice facility,” she said. “We have the big suite rooms, the play yard, and it's very rough the state we are in right now. I'm just thankful we got as many dogs as we did. It could have been much worse.”

Matthew Guerry is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

Teresa Davis, owner of The Canine Club in Bridgeville, looks at her dog, Dobby, as she recounts the story about how flash flooding from a June 20 storm destroyed her Baldwin Street, Bridgeville business and took the lives of five dogs, including three of her own Tuesday, July 3, 2018. Davis said there were 15 dogs at the facility at the time, including Dobby.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Teresa Davis, owner of The Canine Club in Bridgeville, looks at her dog, Dobby, as she recounts the story about how flash flooding from a June 20 storm destroyed her Baldwin Street, Bridgeville business and took the lives of five dogs, including three of her own Tuesday, July 3, 2018. Davis said there were 15 dogs at the facility at the time, including Dobby.
A view of the grooming area at The Canine Club in Bridgeville on Tuesday, July 3, 2018, nearly two weeks after a flash flood destroyed the Baldwin Street business and took the lives of five dogs. A line on the wall shows how high the water got.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
A view of the grooming area at The Canine Club in Bridgeville on Tuesday, July 3, 2018, nearly two weeks after a flash flood destroyed the Baldwin Street business and took the lives of five dogs. A line on the wall shows how high the water got.
Teresa Davis, owner of The Canine Club in Bridgeville, stands inside what was a dog play area as she recounts the story about how flash flooding from a June 20 storm destroyed her Baldwin Street, Bridgeville business and took the lives of five dogs, including three of her own, Tuesday, July 3, 2018. Davis said there were 15 dogs at the facility at the time.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Teresa Davis, owner of The Canine Club in Bridgeville, stands inside what was a dog play area as she recounts the story about how flash flooding from a June 20 storm destroyed her Baldwin Street, Bridgeville business and took the lives of five dogs, including three of her own, Tuesday, July 3, 2018. Davis said there were 15 dogs at the facility at the time.
Teresa Davis, owner of The Canine Club in Bridgeville, holds her dogs Lincoln (left) and Dobby, as she recounts the story about how flash flooding from a June 20 storm destroyed her Baldwin Street, Bridgeville business and took the lives of five dogs, including three of her own Tuesday, July 3, 2018. Davis said there were 15 dogs at the facility at the time, including Lincoln and Dobby.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Teresa Davis, owner of The Canine Club in Bridgeville, holds her dogs Lincoln (left) and Dobby, as she recounts the story about how flash flooding from a June 20 storm destroyed her Baldwin Street, Bridgeville business and took the lives of five dogs, including three of her own Tuesday, July 3, 2018. Davis said there were 15 dogs at the facility at the time, including Lincoln and Dobby.
Wicklow, an Irish wolfhound, stands among bottled water, cleaning supplies and other items inside The Canine Club in Bridgeville on Tuesday, July 3, 2018—nearly two weeks after flash flooding from a June 20 storm destroyed the Baldwin Street business and took the lives of five dogs. Wicklow is one of The Canine Club owner Teresa Davis' dogs, and he was one of 15 dogs at the facility at the time.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Wicklow, an Irish wolfhound, stands among bottled water, cleaning supplies and other items inside The Canine Club in Bridgeville on Tuesday, July 3, 2018—nearly two weeks after flash flooding from a June 20 storm destroyed the Baldwin Street business and took the lives of five dogs. Wicklow is one of The Canine Club owner Teresa Davis' dogs, and he was one of 15 dogs at the facility at the time.
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