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Hampton/Shaler

Ten Minute Play Festival scheduled at Hampton Middle School

| Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, 9:00 p.m.
Hampton Middle School student Addison Gindlesperger, playing Lipowitz, practices her part during rehearsal on Feb. 8, 2017.
Louis Raggiunti | For the Tribune-Review
Hampton Middle School student Addison Gindlesperger, playing Lipowitz, practices her part during rehearsal on Feb. 8, 2017.
Hampton Middle School student Meg Holmes, as Captian Crunch, rehearses on Feb. 8, 2017, at the middle school.
Louis Raggiunti | For the Tribune-Review
Hampton Middle School student Meg Holmes, as Captian Crunch, rehearses on Feb. 8, 2017, at the middle school.
Laynie Loebig, Jessica Hickman and Meg Holmes run through their lines on Feb. 8, 2017 at Hampton Middle School.
Louis Raggiunti | For the Tribune-Review
Laynie Loebig, Jessica Hickman and Meg Holmes run through their lines on Feb. 8, 2017 at Hampton Middle School.

See nine plays in about 90 minutes next week at the Ten Minute Play Festival, performed by the Hampton Middle School drama club.

Actors from sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grades will be performing the short stack of plays at their school auditorium on Feb. 23 and 24, beginning at 7 p.m., according to Gregory Shumaker, director of the school's drama club.

Tickets are available at the door for $5 and $3 for elementary students.

“They're really simple,” said Shumaker about the plays. “The students seem to be really enjoying it and working through the acting part of it.”

Jordan Hearn, a seventh-grader, has the role of the narrator in “Mirror, Mirror.”

“It's a new experience and fun to be on stage with friends. You also get to find new skill sets in acting,” said Hearn.

One of the shows is called “Bully Issues,” which is about “old-school” bullies challenged on how to bully in the modern world. “Hopeless Hamlet” centers around a play where everything goes awry. “Cindy and Julie” is a short piece that features Romeo's Juliet, who never commits suicide, discussing her issues with Cinderella whose relationship with Prince Charming just didn't work out.

Some plays are serious; others are funny, said Shumaker, who also teaches seventh-grade social studies. And while each may seem simple, he said some of them feature only two actors who end up having lots of lines. An example of this is “Finger Food,” which features actors playing a spoon and a fork waiting to be used at a restaurant when there's only finger food being served.

Other plays include “The Force and Jedi Loathing Outside Las Vegas,” “Piratitude,” “The Morgan Show,” and “Call for a Revolution.”

The Middle School Jazz Band will accompany the performances on Friday night, added Shumaker.

The case has about 30 students and Shumaker said each will have speaking lines. There will be a short intermission during the festival, said Schumaker. And the sets are simple, which make transitions quick and easy.

They decided to do this sort of abbreviated play festival in lieu of the talent show, which seemed to have lost a little bit of its popularity over the years, according to Shumaker.

Natalie Beneviat is a Tribune-Review contributor.

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