ShareThis Page
Hampton/Shaler

Major, minor projects finished at Hampton School District

| Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, 9:00 p.m.
Brady Pryal, Scott Cameron, Marissa Snyder and Amelia Strohm, all third graders, read a book together at Central Elementary, which received 16 new area rugs for classrooms as part of upgrades in the district.
Photo by Shari Berg
Brady Pryal, Scott Cameron, Marissa Snyder and Amelia Strohm, all third graders, read a book together at Central Elementary, which received 16 new area rugs for classrooms as part of upgrades in the district.
By doing a lot of the work in house, officials at Hampton Township School District were able to have the new captured vestibule completed under budget, where high school paraprofessional Virginia Sodej worked for the day last week.
Photo by Shari Berg
By doing a lot of the work in house, officials at Hampton Township School District were able to have the new captured vestibule completed under budget, where high school paraprofessional Virginia Sodej worked for the day last week.
Poff Elementary has framed the original United States flag that was used at the school and dates back to the 1950s and is on display.
Photo by Shari Berg
Poff Elementary has framed the original United States flag that was used at the school and dates back to the 1950s and is on display.

Each of the facilities of Hampton Township School District received some type of update, renovation or replacement, including carpeting, painting, or cleaning, according to an update from Rick Farino, supervisor of building and grounds.

At the high school, Farino said they have finished installing the security vestibule at the front entrance, which provides school personnel better control of visitor entry.

“It's another level of security,” said Farino.

Originally proposed to cost between $30,000 to $40,000, Farino said district staff's help allowed completion in time and under budget at a cost of between $17,000 to $18,000.

“We did a lot of the work in house,” said Farino.

Another savings came through CannonDesign, which provided the design and bidding specifications without charging a fee for architecture or design.

The high school's 1969 chorus room got a revamping, removing risers to make more room. Farino said the school personnel indicated they're excited for the new look.

The middle school had major exterior cleaning, said Farino, And blue accent walls were painted in the seventh-grade rooms.

“Teachers really like it. It brightens it up and gives a more homey feeling,” said Farino.

The music rooms received new blinds and organized shelving for instruments. That school's parking lot also had some line repainting.

Central Elementary received 16 new area rugs for classrooms, some painting, as well new drinking fountains, he said.

Poff Elementary had a tree removed from outside and a new third-grade classroom was created. Farino said there were more than 70 extra desks at Poff and the district is looking for donation options, including possibly sending them hurricane damaged school districts in Texas.

A STEAM studio is in place at Poff Elementary, as well.

Another unique addition is that they framed Poff's original United States flag, which is now on display at the building. Dated from late 1950s or early '60s, “it's a great historical representation of Poff,” Loughead said.

Wyland Elementary's ongoing roof replacement has finished its third and final phase, making a completely new roof. The Wyland roofing project, being done by PA Roofing, was budgeted for $265,000, according to previous board meeting reports. VEBH Architects providing project design and other work. The former roof was from the 1990s.

Farino said a 20-year warranty will also be included.

Wyland also received new paint in the fifth-grade hallway and a new fountain near the gymnasium. And some concrete repair was done in the front and rear walkways.

Finally, a new sign adorns the entrance of the main district building, said Farino.

Loughead said they got a lot done over the year and were particularly impressed by the captured vestibule, since a lot of it was done in-house.

“It looks extremely professional. You did it on-time and under budget,” he said.

Farino said they were challenged by a small staff so they did have to do some overtime and Saturdays. But got it accomplished.

Natalie Beneviat is a Tribune-Review contributor.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me