Historic Monroeville log house gets a new roof | TribLIVE.com
Monroeville

Historic Monroeville log house gets a new roof

Dillon Carr
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Handymen Glenn Weathers (right) and Chris Laret work on replacing the McCully Log House’s roof on July 31, 2019.
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A sign for the McGinley and McCully historical houses
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The McCully House is located at 2381 McGinley Road in Monroeville.

One of Monroeville’s oldest structures has a new roof.

The McCully Log House roof hadn’t been replaced for about 20 years, said Louis Chandler, a historian with the Monroeville Historical Society.

Bruce Walker, the historical society’s president, said the new roof cost $3,700 and the work was done by local handymen Glenn Weathers and Chris Laret.

The McCully Log House, situated on McGinley Road behind Forbes Hospital, dates to the early 1800s, when it was built by John McCully off James Street on what is now Queen Drive.

According to the Monroeville Historical Society’s website, the land where the house originally sat belonged to the Miers’ family — one of the municipality’s original settlers.

The family sold the land to McCully in 1810, and he built the house near his brother, James, who had a house on the street that is now named after him — James Street.

The McCully house was condemned and slated for demolition in 1992, which spurred volunteers at the Monroeville Historical Society to relocate the structure to McGinley Road, next to the stone house that was built around 1830.

“Funds were raised and a group of volunteers worked to strip away the 20th-century façade, dismantle the house, carefully tag all the components, and transport it, piece by piece,” wrote Louis Chandler on the Monroeville Historical Society’s website.

The reconstruction was finished by 1995 and today, the house serves as one of four structures the Monroeville Historical Society manages.

Free tours of the homes that sit on McGinley Road are available by calling Chandler at 724-989-2127.

The Monroeville Historical Society will sponsor its annual Heritage Day Festival from 1 to 5 p.m. Oct. 12 at the McCully and McGinley houses, 2381 McGinley Road.

For details, visit the historical society’s website at monroevillehistorical.org or call 412-245-1527.

Dillon Carr is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Dillon at 412-871-2325, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Local | Monroeville
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