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‘More that you read, more that you learn’: Read Across America celebrates Dr. Seuss, children literacy | TribLIVE.com
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‘More that you read, more that you learn’: Read Across America celebrates Dr. Seuss, children literacy

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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Kindergartners Noah Miller, left, and Talik Thomas celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday during a pancake breakfast provided by Seton Hill University for students who met their reading goals at McKee Elementary School in Jeannette on Friday, March 1, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Kindergartner Ali Shadle proudly wears her Cat in the Hat headband as she and her classmates celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday at a pancake breakfast Friday provided by Seton Hill University for students who met their reading goals at McKee Elementary School in Jeannette.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Za’Riah Powell, left, and Talik Thomas celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday during a pancake breakfast provided by Seton Hill University for students who met their reading goals at McKee Elementary School in Jeannette on Friday, March 1, 2019.
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Random House
Cover of "I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!," by Dr. Seuss Cover of “I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!,” by Dr. Seuss

Saturday marks the annual date for Read Across America, an awareness program that calls for every child in every community to celebrate reading on March 2 — the birthday of beloved children’s book author Dr. Seuss.

Here are some facts and figures about Dr. Seuss, the program and childhood literacy:

March 2, 1904

Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as children’s book author Dr. Seuss, was born in Springfield, Mass.

1998

National Education Association launches Read Across America. Among newly released books that year was “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” by J.K. Rowling.

83%

Percentage of U.S. children who say they love to be read to

48%

Percentage of young children in U.S. who are read to daily

65%

Percentage of U.S. fourth graders who do not read at a proficient level

13

Average number of books, per child, in U.S. middle-income homes

“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

— Dr. Seuss, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut!

Sources: National Education Association, Children’s Literacy Foundation

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