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Murrysville

Franklin Regional art department creates 'slumped' glass for telethon fundraiser

Patrick Varine
| Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, 12:03 p.m.
Franklin Regional Senior High School art teacher Lori Mozina has created flattened glass bottles using a technique called 'slumping.'
Submitted photo
Franklin Regional Senior High School art teacher Lori Mozina has created flattened glass bottles using a technique called 'slumping.'
Franklin Regional Senior High School art teacher Lori Mozina has created flattened glass bottles using a technique called “slumping.”
Submitted photo
Franklin Regional Senior High School art teacher Lori Mozina has created flattened glass bottles using a technique called “slumping.”

Franklin Regional educators are always looking for new ways to incorporate STEAM concepts — science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics — into their curricula.

For high-school art teacher Lori Mozina, that search led her to a new way of raising money at this year’s Franklin Regional Senior High Telethon.

“We do a whole big unit on glass: stained glass, fused glass, and I try incorporate ‘the science of art’ into it. One of the things that stems from that is ‘slumping,’” Mozina said.

“Slumping” is heating a glass structure nearly to its melting point. Mozina used bottles.

“The bottles start to ‘slump,’ where they start to melt down but don’t form a full puddle,” she said.

The result is a flattened bottle that still retains some three-dimensional elements. The process is typically used to create things like glass plates and bowls, but a little creativity can result in a wide variety of shapes.

“I have a small kiln used for enameling, and I started practicing with the settings,” Mozina said. “It started out with me just getting familiar with the process. And then I had a couple teachers say, ‘Ooh, those are really pretty, I’d like to get one.’”

Mozina is the faculty adviser for the FR National Art Honors Society, and the group always contributes to the annual telethon. Rather than doing face painting, she opted this year to sell slumped bottles.

The telethon’s frenetic pace may require some additional creativity, however.

“Because they’re breakable, I don’t know about bringing them there with all the different things going on,” she said.

In addition to accepting donated glass bottles at the high school office, Mozina is also taking orders for people who want slumped glass.

“People can bring a bottle they want to buy back once it’s slumped, and if they put their name and contact information on it, I can keep track of them that way,” she said.

She plans to sell small bottles for $5 and larger bottles for $10.

Donations or potential orders can be brought to the Franklin Regional Senior High School office at 3210 School Road, marked “Art Department.”

Miniature liquor bottles work very well, although Mozina did give a small caveat.

“Not all bottles make it,” she said. “Some glass has flaws, and it can crack while it’s heating.”

Donors are asked to remove the label and adhesive from bottles, as they can result in flaws and permanent marks during the heating process.

Patrick Varine is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Patrick at 724-850-2862, pvarine@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MurrysvilleStar.

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