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Photos: Carnegie Science Center sessions at Franklin Regional | TribLIVE.com
Murrysville

Photos: Carnegie Science Center sessions at Franklin Regional

Patrick Varine
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Chloe Gess stirs a chalk mixture in a first grade chemistry session during a March visit by Carnegie Science Center employees, who presented a variety of science programs.
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Ben Longo observes an endothermic reaction during a “chemistry in a bag” session during a March visit by Carnegie Science Center employees, who presented a variety of science programs.
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Lilly Nagoda, Mackenzie Hartman, and Celina Camacho work to build a pipe cleaner tower during a March visit by Carnegie Science Center employees, who presented a variety of science programs.
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Airyanna Prinkey, Isabella Cesare, and Ella Benson prepare components of a chemistry experiment during a March visit by Carnegie Science Center employees, who presented a variety of science programs.
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Laila Noble and her classmates blow a column of bubbles using a straw inserted into a styrofoam cup covered by a piece of cloth during a March visit by Carnegie Science Center employees, who presented a variety of science programs.
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A Carnegie Science Center instructor launches a rocket in a fifth grade classroom session during a March visit by science center employees, who presented a variety of science programs.
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Cali Fabec and her teammates wait to see how many marbles their Lego boat can carry during a March visit by Carnegie Science Center employees, who presented a variety of science programs.
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Ashlyn Yohe, Nolan McGuire, and Max Evans check to see how well their Lego boat is floating during a March visit by Carnegie Science Center employees, who presented a variety of science programs.
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Kindergarten student Zane Pizzica blows bubbles in a “Bubble Trouble” session during a March visit by Carnegie Science Center employees.

Students at Heritage Elementary in Murrysville recently had a visit from Carnegie Science Center instructors, who brought the center’s “Science on the Road” programming to the school.

Each classroom was able to participate in science hands-on during the programs. Kindergarten experienced “Bubble Trouble,” first graders created “Chemical Concoctions,” second grade students learned to “Build It – Break It,” third graders did a little “Chemistry in a Bag,” fourth grade students underwent an engineering challenge, and fifth graders learned about rockets.

The Heritage PTO secured grant funding to coordinate the programming.

Patrick Varine is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Patrick at 724-850-2862, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Local | Murrysville
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