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2 Pittsburgh-based companies help refugee moms | TribLIVE.com
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2 Pittsburgh-based companies help refugee moms

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
1110792_web1_PTR-LARK-050519
Lark Adventurewear
Lark Adventurewear will donate 10 percent of profits May 6-17 to support the efforts of Hello Neighbor, a Pittsburgh-based non-profit that works to improve the lives of resettled refugee famiiles.

This is about moms helping moms.

Pittsburgh based Hello Neighbor and Lark Adventurewear, both founded by local mothers making an impact regionally and nationally through their individual work, have teamed to make a difference in the lives of refugee moms, according to a news release.

Lark Adventurewear is a company that makes eco-friendly clothing out of natural, breathing, wicking fabric for children.

It is donating clothing to all new moms who are enrolled in the Hello Neighbor program, which works to improve the lives of recently resettled refugee families by matching them with dedicated neighbors to guide and support them in their new lives.

And beginning Monday through May 17 (May 12 is Mother’s Day), Lark Adventurewear will donate 10% of profits to support Hello Neighbor’s efforts, the release says.

Refugee moms, like all moms, are faced with decisions every day for how to best care for their children. But they have an added layer of stress, being not only new to Pittsburgh and the U.S., but often times lacking a local support network.

Since 2017, Hello Neighbor, founded by Sloane Davidson, has matched 72 families from 11 countries with Pittsburghers to act as mentors, advocates and ultimately, friends, the press release says.

Lark Adventurewear was founded in 2016 by Pallavi Golla, shortly after her son Vyan was born. She was in awe of his curiosity as he explored the world around him.

While outdoors, Golla began to notice that while she remained comfortable and cool in her adult activewear, Vyan was hot, sweaty and damp in his clothing, the release says.

She quickly realized that no activewear existed for smaller children and made it her mission to create eco-friendly activewear. Golla developed a bamboo fabric called Softek that is breathable, UPF 50+ and super soft to protect little ones from sun and sweat, it says in the release.

Details: https://www.helloneighbor.io/ or https://larkadventurewear.com/

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 412-320-7889, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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