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Allegheny County launches Adopt-a-Roadway program | TribLIVE.com
Allegheny

Allegheny County launches Adopt-a-Roadway program

Tom Davidson
| Wednesday, March 6, 2019 10:22 a.m.
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Roads owned by Allegheny County are now up for adoption, so to speak.

The county has launched a new Adopt-a-Roadway program that will allow people and organizations to pledge to keep sections of roads clean of litter.

Litter on the roads is especially visible during this gray time of year. The program aims to enlist the help of people in the community to clean up the roadways, the county said in a news release.

Volunteers will be recognized with signs posted along the roads they’ve adopted.

The program is open to non-political organizations, corporations, groups, and individuals, according to the county.

“Many of us take great pride in our community, and the Adopt-a-Roadway program is an excellent way to show that pride while providing a clean environment that supports our local wildlife,” County Executive Rich Fitzgerald said in a news release. “The program can also serve as a reminder to the public not to litter, while also saving taxpayer money.”

Those interested in adopting a county-owned road can call 412‑350‑4636, email adopt-a-roadway@alleghenycounty.us, or complete an online form at www.alleghenycounty.us/aar.

Adoption applications must be completed by an adult (age 18 or older), but anyone age 14 or older may participate in cleanup events.

Adopters must organize, at minimum, two cleanup events each year for two years — one in the spring during March or April in conjunction with the Great American Cleanup, and one in the fall during September or October. There must be one adult for every eight children age 17 or younger at cleanup events, and children must have parental permission.

The county will work with prospective adopters to select roadway sites that are available and safe for volunteers.

Areas with restricted visibility, high runoff potential, steep slopes, or narrow roadside/roadway shoulders aren’t eligible for adoption. Nor are county-owned bridges.

The county will also provide adopters with “Litter Crew Ahead” signs and other required equipment for scheduled clean-ups. Safety vests, trash bags, and works gloves will be available upon request, and the county will pick up the bagged litter from the roadside after clean-ups.

“We’re excited to get started with this program, and we believe it will be great way for local organizations and residents to show pride in their community by beautifying our roads,” Public Works Director Stephen Shanley said in the news release.

Tom Davidson is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Tom at 724-226-4715, tdavidson@tribweb.com or via Twitter .

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