Bear cub caught on camera crossing Sharpsburg street | TribLIVE.com
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Bear cub caught on camera crossing Sharpsburg street

Tawnya Panizzi
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A bear was spotted on camera wandering near the Sharpsburg municipal building on July 1, 2019.

Sharpsburg Mayor Matt Rudzki chuckled at the surveillance video of a bear cub wandering Sunday night through the borough.

“It likely lost it bearings,” he joked.

In all seriousness, the mayor said he could barely believe it when police Officer Dan Sciulli called to report the sighting, captured on video at about 10 p.m. from cameras installed at the municipal building/fire hall complex.

The small cub was seen crossing the street from the 16th Street Playground to the borough building parking lot at 1611 Main Street.

Rudzki said police received reports of a second bear sighting last night and officers attempted to locate the bears, but could not find them.

“With all of the exciting things going on in Sharpsburg, we are attracting many new visitors,” Councilman Greg Domian said.

Officials reminded residents to not approach a bear, try to take pictures of it or feed it.

The Pennsylvania Game Commission was notified.

Councilman Jon Jaso said he was surprised to hear about the bear’s visit, but figured it was simply searching for food. If there is none to be found, the bear will likely move on quickly, he said.

“Rest assured that we are on top of this and working with the game commission to move them out of our area,” Jaso said, adding, “I guess they also figured out what a special town that we have here.”

The Sharpsburg bear sighting was at least the seventh in the region this season.

Bell Acres police issued two warnings last week about black bear sightings in the borough.

On June 26, police posted on Facebook about a bear in the area of Witherow Road. The animal stopped for a snack at a backyard bird feeder, police said. They encouraged residents to remove food sources and secure trash at their properties.

The following day, police got another call about a bear wandering in the 1700 block of Big Sewickley Creek Road.

On June 14, a black bear was spotted near South Park and Drake roads in Bethel Park and that same week, black bears were reported in Upper St. Clair near Boyce Mayview Park and in South Fayette, eating bird seed in the Hunting Ridge CSA and Fairview neighborhoods.

Another young black bear was spotted in Penn Hills along Frankstown Road. Social media reports and game commission officials said it was likely the same one spotted in Turtle Creek and Monroeville.

Game Warden Dan Puhala said, “Give the bear space. It’s going to move on.”

Tawnya Panizzi is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Tawnya at 412-782-2121 x1512, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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