Capezzuto’s Pizza opens in Greenfield, at site of old Conicella’s | TribLIVE.com
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Capezzuto’s Pizza opens in Greenfield, at site of old Conicella’s

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
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JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
Matthew Capezzuto of Swissvale co-owns Capezzuto’s Pizza in Greenfield with his wife Naama Balass. The shop opened May 14 at the site of the former Conicella’s Pizza.
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JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
Pepperoni pizza bagels at Capezzuto’s Pizza in Greenfield which is owned by Naama Balass and her husband Matthew Capezzuto of Swissvale The shop opened May 14 at the site of the former Conicella’s Pizza.
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JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
The first two orders at Capezzuto’s Pizza in Greenfield which is owned by Naama Balass and her husband Matthew Capezzuto of Swissvale The shop opened May 14 at the site of the former Conicella’s Pizza.
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JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
Naama Balass takes the first order at Capezzuto’s Pizza in Greenfield which she co-owns with husband Matthew Capezzuto of Swissvale The shop opened May 14 at the site of the former Conicella’s Pizza.
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JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
One of the first pizzas made at Capezzuto’s Pizza in Greenfield which is owned by Naama Balass and her husband Matthew Capezzuto of Swissvale The shop opened May 14 at the site of the former Conicella’s Pizza.
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JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
A meatball hoagie at Capezzuto’s Pizza in Greenfield which is owned by Naama Balass and her husband Matthew Capezzuto of Swissvale The shop opened May 14 at the site of the former Conicella’s Pizza.

This piece of advice stuck with Matthew Capezzuto when he opened his own place – Capezzuto’s Pizza — on Tuesday in Greenfield.

“Concentrate on one pie at a time.”

“I remember Joe Aiello telling me that,” said Capezzuto, who had worked at Aiello’s Pizza in Squirrel Hill since 1996. “You can have lots of order slips in front of you, but the only one that matters is the one you are making at the moment. If not, then it becomes chaos.”

Those who knew Aiello remember his ability to make you feel like your pizza was the most important one he would make all day. Capezzuto recalled those words from Aiello as the phone began ringing at 11:14 a.m. with the first order from Chad Cynamon of Squirrel Hill. It was a medium plain pizza.

“I have known (Capezzuto) for a long time,” Cynamon said. “It is so nice to see him branching out. He is such a hard worker. I know this will be successful.”

Capezzuto already has a winning recipe. He is located at the site where Conicella’s Pizza churned out pies for nearly 40 years. When he purchased the business, it included the equipment as well as the dough, sauce and cheese that made Conicella’s a Greenfield staple.

And, one other important thing, the phone number.

Former co-owner Carmine Conicella has been wonderful through the transition, said Capezzuto, who had been looking for a place for while. He drove by, and saw it was available. He made a call and the “rest is history,” said the Swissvale resident and Allderdice High School graduate.

He said opening in a place where there is already a customer base that loved Conicella’s is a plus. Conicella said he is glad to turn the business over to Capezzuto.

“He will do well,” said Conicella, who owned the shop with his brother Vince. “He has added to the menu which is good. We had more of a basic menu. I told him I will be there for whatever he needs.”

Capezzuto’s wife and co-owner Naama Balass took the day off from her job at the University of Pittsburgh for the opening.

“We are very excited, “ said Balass, who met Capezzuto when he was working at Aiello’s. “People have been coming by asking when we are going to open. This is such a special day. He has always wanted a place of his own and he found it, in Greenfield.”

He expanded the menu to include a Sicilian pie and nine specialty pizzas such as Hawaiian, buffalo chicken, and pierogi and a few extra hoagies such as ham and cheese and capicola and cheese.

The tasty pizza bagels remain at $3. There are 23 pizza topping choices, including the mini pepperoni. A small is $11 and a medium is $12. It’s $13 for a large and $14 for an extra large. Sicilian is $15. Toppings are $1.75 each.

“Matt is awesome,” said John Katsos, of Swissvale, who was picking up a meat lover’s pie of pepperoni, ham, capicola, sausage and bacon. “People were bummed when Conicella’s closed. It’s in good hands with this guy. Whatever he does, he goes all in.”

Capezzuto’s is located at 422 Greenfield Ave.

Hours are 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 3 to 9 p.m. Sunday.

Details: 412-521-6570 or https://www.facebook.com/capezzutospizza/

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 412-320-7889, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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