Heavy rains on Halloween prompted flooding, mudslide, road closures across Western Pa. | TribLIVE.com
Allegheny

Heavy rains on Halloween prompted flooding, mudslide, road closures across Western Pa.

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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
A car is pulled from Pine Creek behind Route 8 in Shaler on Thursday.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
A car is pulled from Pine Creek behind Route 8 in Shaler on Thursday.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
A car is pulled from Pine Creek behind Route 8 in Shaler on Thursday.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
A car is pulled from Pine Creek behind Route 8 in Shaler on Thursday.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
A car is pulled from Pine Creek behind Route 8 in Shaler on Thursday.

Heavy rains soaking the region Thursday afternoon have caused flooding, mudslides and road closures.

More than 1,000 households in Oakmont and nearly 200 in Penn Hills were without power, Duquesne Light’s power outage maps showed as of about 10 p.m. West Penn Power’s parent company, First Energy, showed small pockets of outages, with the main exception being a group of between 100-500 customers near Duff Park in Murrysville who are without power due to tree damage.

Trees were falling onto roadways all over Allegheny and Westmoreland counties as high winds blew through the region all night. A Westmoreland 911 supervisor said the majority of the county’s issues on Thursday night were related to downed trees or power lines.

Power was restored to homes in Ross and Pittsburgh’s Beechview neighborhood after being without service for several hours.

Officials closed Freeport Road near Fox Chapel Road in Aspinwall. Firefighters responded to a mudslide at Scott Farm at Oakdale Road.

In Franklin Park, multiple vehicles were trapped on a flooded road at about 4 p.m., a few hours after a car rolled into a creek in Shaler, closing a portion of Route 8.

Shortly after 5 p.m., Findlay Township declared a state of emergency, which is a move to free up federal funding for urgent needs related to the storm and flooding, county officials said. A power outage affected nearly 400 Findlay households.

Nearly 2 inches of rain fell in some places “in a short period of time, which was exacerbated by poor drainage” as fallen leaves clogged storm drains, the weather service said.

“We are getting reports of flooding in the area as leaves are wreaking havoc on storm drainage capabilities,” officials with the weather service office in Moon Township posted to Twitter about 4 p.m. “Be careful driving home.”

The Route 8 crash happened between Elfinwild Road and Burchfield Road around 1:30 p.m. The car was on its roof in Pine Creek, with only the undercarriage visible above the water. A tow truck was brought in to remove the car.

Rescuers pulled a man from the car, Shaler police said. He was taken to a hospital; his condition was not immediately available.

North of Latrobe, near Indiana, a severe thunderstorm warning was in effect until shortly after 5 p.m. that meteorologists predicted could bring 60 mph winds, hail and conditions for a potential tornado.

Earlier in the day, the weather service dropped a tornado watch that had been been issued for parts of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Maryland.

There were numerous roads that were reported to be closed throughout the afternoon and night.

However, by 10:30 p.m., there was only one being reported by Allegheny County officials:

• Ferry Road in Sewickley Hills and Sewickley Heights.

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