Ex-WPXI anchor Darieth Chisolm victorious in revenge porn case | TribLIVE.com
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Ex-WPXI anchor Darieth Chisolm victorious in revenge porn case

Samson X Horne
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John Altdorfer | For the Tribune-Review
Darieth Chisolm rocks the roof during the Jeans, Jewels and Jazz benefit for the Cancer Caring Center at the Left Field Meeting Space on Federal Street on the Northside of Pittsburgh. June 4, 2015.

After two years of waging an international court case against revenge porn, former WPXI news anchor Darieth Chisolm can claim victory.

Chisolm’s ex-boyfriend, Donovan Powell, 53, of Jamaica pleaded guilty in Jamaican court to three charges related to distributing nude pictures of the journalist, according to The (Jamaica) Gleaner.

The charges fall under the country’s four-year-old Cybercrimes Act. Powell was accused of creating a website where he posted nude pictures of Chisolm along with derogatory comments.

In a Monday Instagram post, Chisolm rejoiced.

“I step out of the court room in Jamaica today with a sense of relief, extreme gratitude, excitement for what’s next…” she wrote. “I learned that mine was the first case of its kind setting history and precedence in Jamaica for an American citizen to bring charges under their Malicious Communications Act and Cyber Crimes.”

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Yes! Yes…. finally victory in my case!!! I’ve fought for over two years to win my international case of revenge porn and cyber harassment and now, with the help of U.S. Homeland Security Investigations Special Agents, The Jamaican Constabulary Force and The Office of the Director of Public Prosecution in Jamaica, it’s over. I stepped out of the court room in Jamaica today with a sense of relief, extreme gratitude, excitement for what’s next with my advocacy for victims and my documentary on these crimes 50 Shades of Silence and somewhat saddened by this all. I learned that mine was the first case of its kind setting history and precedence in Jamaica for an American citizen to bring charges under their Malicious Communications Act and Cyber Crimes. Now if we can only get International authorities worldwide to pay attention to this growing epidemic and give voice and dignity to so many other victims. Thank you to Chuck, Tre, my team, my family and friends and supporters and to God and all the angels who’ve assisted me! #forsuchatimeasthis #staystrong #endrevengeporn #endcyberharassment #useyourvoice #50shadesofsilence#staystrong #endrevengeporn #endcyberharassment #useyourvoice #50shadesofsilence http://jamaica-gleaner.com/article/news/20190722/jamaican-man-guilty-revenge-porn-targeting-former-american-tv-anchor.

A post shared by Darieth Chisolm (@dariethchisolm) on

Chisolm, during a speech in Pittsburgh last summer, said Powell took the photos while she was sleeping.

In addition, she said Powell threatened to kill her — either by shooting her or stabbing her through the heart.

“This began for me, months of pain, and depression and anger, and confusion and silence,” said Chisolm, who has become an anti-harassment activist through her website, 50 Shades of Silence.

She laments that the United States is lagging behind in criminalizing revenge porn, only having one federal bill called “The Enough Act,” which could “take years to pass.”

The bill was proposed by 2020 presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif.

Samson X Horne is a Tribune-Review digital producer. You can contact Samson at 412-320-7845, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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