‘Food Podcast’: Gearing up for the Fall Food Share | TribLIVE.com
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‘Food Podcast’: Gearing up for the Fall Food Share

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Courtesy of Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank
Dietz & Watson Inc., a Philadelphia deli meats and cheese company, has packed up 9,000 pounds of food for donation to the Greater Pittsburgh Community Foodbank.

The Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank and Giant Eagle are gearing up for Fall Food Share, the region’s largest food and funds drive.

The Fall Food Share will take place Oct. 24 through Nov. 27 at participating Giant Eagle locations. Details are shared during the third episode of the Food Podcast.

“This is an opportunity, every year, for us to extend our reach (to) team members and customers that shop, to invite them to participate and join us in supporting the community together,” said Jannah Jablonowski, public relations specialist for Giant Eagle. “We feel really passionate about getting in (the communities) and helping everybody to put food on the table.”

Shoppers at participating Giant Eagle locations are asked to make a monetary or food donation at the register. All monetary and food donations stay in the counties where the donation is made.

“No person or family should go without food, especially during the holiday season,” said Brian Gulish, vice president of marketing and communications at the food bank. “Fall Food Share not only helps us both financially and securing food donations, it also provides an added opportunity to educate and create awareness for hunger and food insecurity in our region.”

For more information on Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank visit www.pittsburghfoodbank.org or call 412-460-3663.

LISTEN: The Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank and Giant Eagle are gearing up for Fall Food Share

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