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Large collection of mummies arrives in Pittsburgh for Carnegie Science Center exhibit

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
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At the Carnegie Science Center on Tuesday, boxes are unloaded from a trailer containing the largest collection of real mummies and related artifacts ever assembled.
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Jason Brown, interim director of the Carnegie Science Center, helps open the doors of a trailer holding the largest collection of real mummies and related artifacts ever assembled.
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Boxes are unloaded from a trailer containing the largest collection of real mummies and related artifacts ever assembled at the Carnegie Science Center on Sept. 10, 2019.
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Boxes are unloaded from a trailer containing the largest collection of real mummies and related artifacts ever assembled at the Carnegie Science Center on Sept. 10, 2019.
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Boxes are unloaded from a trailer containing the largest collection of real mummies and related artifacts ever assembled at the Carnegie Science Center on Sept. 10, 2019.
1650166_web1_PTR-MUMMIES09-091119
Boxes are unloaded from a trailer containing the largest collection of real mummies and related artifacts ever assembled at the Carnegie Science Center on Sept. 10, 2019.

Step aside, zombie lovers: The mummies have arrived in Pittsburgh. But they’ll remain under wraps until Oct. 5 in their temporary home at the Carnegie Science Center on Pittsburgh’s North Side.

They came to the city Tuesday in a temperature-controlled truck under heavy security for “Mummies of the World: The Exhibition,” located in the center’s PPG Science Pavilion.

“This exhibition aligns perfectly with our mission, as these mummies provide a wealth of scientific, anthropological, archaeological, anatomical, medical and historical information,” said Jason Brown, the science center’s Henry Buhl Jr. interim director, at a press conference.

The mummies traveled more than 2,000 miles from an exhibition in Phoenix.

The exhibit, which runs through April 19, features 40 real human and animal mummies and 85 related artifacts from around the world. Visitors can see a mummified family from Hungary, a mummified German nobleman found in the crypt of a 14th-century castle, South American shrunken heads, and more.

The largest exhibition of mummies ever assembled, it will take a few weeks to set up. The exhibit requires special lighting and temperature.

Brown said this is a calm, quiet and reverential exhibit.

“We will treat the mummies with the respect we would for living people,” Brown said. “It’s an exhibit that integrates history and science, which is what we strive to do here at the science center.”

He said the exhibit has been viewed by over 2 million visitors across the world.

“We built this special PPG Science Pavilion specifically for this purpose,” he said. “It is climate controlled. It is humidity controlled. Because, otherwise you can’t bring exhibitions like this in. This is something you can’t see anywhere else, and we really believe it is going to appeal to a broad audience and will bring people from all over the region and all over the commonwealth to come and see it.”

“This is great for tourism,” said Craig Davis, president and CEO of VisitPittsburgh. “People will come to see the exhibit … and they will stay and enjoy the city.”

Tickets are on sale now.

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 412-320-7889, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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