Man charged in fatal shooting of Pittsburgh officer Calvin Hall | TribLIVE.com
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Man charged in fatal shooting of Pittsburgh officer Calvin Hall

Tom Davidson
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Family members of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall comfort each other outside of Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland on Monday, July 22, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh police officers mill about outside of Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland during the visitation of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall on Monday, July 22, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Mourners enter Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland for the visitation of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall on Monday, July 22, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Family members of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall comfort each other outside of Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland on July 22, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
A rose is placed on the cruiser of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall’s cruiser parked outside of Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland on Monday, July 22, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Family members of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall comfort each other outside of Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland on July 22, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh police officers mill about outside of Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland during the visitation of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall on Monday, July 22, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh police officers mill about outside of Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland during the visitation of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall on Monday, July 22, 2019.
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Calvin Hall is pictured in this September 2017 photo provided by Point Park University.
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WPXI
Pittsburgh police said Monday they have charged a 30-year-old Christian Bey with homicide in connection with the shooting death ofofficer Calvin Hall.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh police officers mill about outside of Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall during the visitation of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall on Monday, July 22, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Family members of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall hold hands outside of Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland on July 22, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh police officers stand guard at the entrance to Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland during the visitation of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall on Monday, July 22, 2019.

There are no words Eugenia Hall-Miller can say to comfort her mother.

“Her heart has been ripped out of her,” Miller said Monday, during a respite from a daylong visitation for her slain brother, Pittsburgh police Officer Calvin Hall. “And I have to watch her suffer every day for the loss of her son.”

Hall, 36, died Wednesday from wounds he suffered July 14 when he was shot in Homewood while he was off-duty but “acting under the color of the law,” according to Pittsburgh police Chief Scott Schubert.

Minutes before Hall’s sister spoke to the media, police officials announced charges against Christian Bey, 30, of Pittsburgh in connection with Hall’s death.

“The arresting detectives took great satisfaction in placing Calvin’s handcuffs on the actor,” Major Crimes Commander Victor Joseph told reporters Monday in front of Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland.

The complaint charging Bey is sealed, and authorities would not detail what charges Bey is facing or what led them to file the charges.

“We are overjoyed that the suspect has been arrested,” Hall-Miller said.

She thanked the detectives who worked to solve the case and had these words for Bey: “To the coward that shot my brother, in the back, and killed him: May God have mercy on your soul.”

The investigation was a team effort and involved several Pittsburgh police units, other law enforcement officials and city residents, Joseph said as he also thanked Hall’s family for their patience and understanding as the investigation progressed.

“I want to thank our community for coming forward and providing critical information into this investigation,” Joseph said.

Investigating Hall’s death took a toll on the department, Schubert said, and he also thanked the community for its support.

“ ‘Catch the person who killed Calvin,’ ” was one of the first requests the family made of the department, Pittsburgh Public Safety Director Wendell Hissrich said, and officers worked tirelessly to fulfill it.

Hall, who lived in West Mifflin, was visiting family in Homewood the night he was shot and had been trying to de-escalate an argument, family members previously told the Trib.

“Go up to a police officer and say ‘Thank you’ for the work they do day in and day out,” Hissrich said.

Zone 1 Commander Christopher Ragland, who leads the city zone that includes the Northview Heights Public Safety Center, where Hall was assigned, thanked people for the “outpouring of love, support and kindness they have shown us” as they mourned.

Hall’s funeral will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall.

Bey, 30, of Pittsburgh has a criminal history that dates back to 2007, including convictions related to drug possession, carrying a firearm without a license and assault, court records show. Bey was arrested in 2010 as part of a multi-state cocaine ring targeted by police and sentenced to three to six years in prison, according to court documents.

In January 2015, Bey was sentenced to a minimum of nine months of prison and three years of probation related to a July 14, 2014 arrest related to a DUI and evading police. Bey pleaded guilty to the felony charge of fleeing or attempting to elude officers and misdemeanor charges of driving with a blood-alcohol content above 0.16, reckless driving, driving without his lights to avoid arrest and failing to stop at a red light, court records show.

He was denied parole at least four times in 2014 and 2015.

Police took Bey into custody last week on a parole violation.

Tom Davidson is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Tom at 724-226-4715, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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