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New neonatal intensive care unit opens at West Penn Hospital | TribLIVE.com
Allegheny

New neonatal intensive care unit opens at West Penn Hospital

Madasyn Czebiniak
| Wednesday, January 9, 2019 5:29 p.m

NICU

West Penn Hospital on Wednesday unveiled a new, $23 million neonatal intensive care unit to provide care for premature babies.

The 16,500-square-foot unit at the Bloomfield facility features 23 private rooms and state of the art treatment capabilities. Three of the rooms are designated for twins.

There also are beds that allow parents to sleep with their babies; a lounge area for parents, which includes kitchen facilities and showers; cameras that allow parents to watch their child from a smartphone, laptop or tablet; a smartphone-based, pager-free notification system that provides immediate alerts to nurses when an infants’ vital signs change; and an enhanced security system.

West Penn treats more than 1,000 critically ill infants annually from more than 200 communities throughout western Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia, according to Allegheny Health Network. Officials said the unit is the first phase of an expansion and renovation of the program that will continue over the next year.


Madasyn Czebiniak is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Madasyn at 724-226-4702, mczebiniak@tribweb.com, or via Twitter @maddyczebstrib.


Madasyn Czebiniak is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Madasyn at 724-226-4702, mczebiniak@tribweb.com or via Twitter .


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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Developmental Specialist Hillary Thomas holds 7 month old Amelia Joyce, as her parents Alyson and Michael take care of her brother Owen and sister Ave, during the ribbon cutting for a state of the art Neonatal Intensive Care Unit which includes a 23 bed private room unit, at West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh, on Wednesday, on Jan. 9, 2019. The triplets were born at 31 weeks, and had NICU stays ranging from 30 days for Ava, up to 50 days for Amelia. Thomas worked closely with all three babies, and was responsible for getting Amelia to begin to eat on her own.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Evie Vadnerschaaff (left), 8, of East Deer, Luca Cipriani, 7, of Wheeling, WV, , and Jacey Schoonover, of Allegheny Township, all graduates of the NICU, prepare to cut the ribbon, during the opening ceremony for a state of the art Neonatal Intensive Care Unit which includes a 23 bed private room unit, at West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh, on Wednesday, on Jan. 9, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Twins Brandt (left), and Wade Scholar, 13, of South Fayette, listen to their mom Heidi talk about their four month stay in NICU, during the ribbon cutting for a state of the art Neonatal Intensive Care Unit which includes a 23 bed private room unit, at West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh, on Wednesday, on Jan. 9, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Graduates of the NICU, make the first cuts, during the ribbon cutting for a state of the art Neonatal Intensive Care Unit which includes a 23 bed private room unit, at West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh, on Wednesday, on Jan. 9, 2019. Graduates of the NICU, make the first cuts, during the ribbon cutting for a state of the art Neonatal Intensive Care Unit which includes a 23 bed private room unit, at West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh, on Wednesday, on Jan. 9, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The new private rooms include a bed for family to stay over night, a breast pump for mom, along with other amenities to help family and baby bond while in the NICU, as seen during the ribbon cutting for a state of the art Neonatal Intensive Care Unit which includes a 23 bed private room unit, at West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh, on Wednesday, on Jan. 9, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Ronald Andro, President and CEO of West Penn Hospital, welcomes the families and “graduates” or former NICU patients, during the ribbon cutting for a state of the art Neonatal Intensive Care Unit which includes a 23 bed private room unit, at West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh, on Wednesday, on Jan. 9, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald is given a tour of the new private units, during the ribbon cutting for a state of the art Neonatal Intensive Care Unit which includes a 23 bed private room unit, at West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh, on Wednesday, on Jan. 9, 2019.
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