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Peregrine falcon chicks banded at Pitt’s Cathedral of Learning | TribLIVE.com
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Peregrine falcon chicks banded at Pitt’s Cathedral of Learning

Paul Guggenheimer

Two peregrine falcon chicks got a medical checkup and were fitted with U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service leg bands Tuesday morning.

The chicks are less than a month old. Their parents Hope and Terzo have been nesting on the 40th floor of the University of Pittsburgh’s Cathedral of Learning for the past four years.

Although no longer listed on the federal endangered species list, peregrine falcons were classified as an endangered species in Pennsylvania until last fall when they were upgraded to “threatened” as a result of their growing population. There are currently eight nesting pairs in the Pittsburgh region, all of them residing on man-made structures.

Peregrine falcons can live 12 to 15 years in the wild. Females usually lay three to five eggs each year.

Paul Guggenheimer is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Paul at 724-226-7706 or [email protected].


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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
A peregrine falcon chick nesting atop the Cathedral of Learning is given a medical exam on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh on May 14, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Aidan Beatty and son Keir Beatty, 3, of Regent Square, look on as employees of the Pennsylvania Game Commission check on the health of a peregrine falcon chick nesting atop the Cathedral of Learning on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh on May 14, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
An adult peregrine falcon looks inside the windows atop the Cathedral of Learning on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh on May 14, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Wildlife Biology Technician Sam Ruano watches as an adult peregrine falcon defends its nest atop the Cathedral of Learning on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh on May 14, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Wildlife Biology Technician Sam Ruano takes notes dictated by Wildlife Diversity Division Chief Dan Brauning while checking on the health of a peregrine falcon chick nesting atop the Cathedral of Learning on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh on May 14, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Wildlife Diversity Division Chief Dan Brauning checks on the health of a peregrine falcon chick nesting atop the Cathedral of Learning on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh on May 14, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Wildlife Biology Technician Sam Ruano watches as an adult peregrine falcon defends its nest atop the Cathedral of Learning on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh on May 14, 2019.
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Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
A peregrine falcon chick nesting atop the Cathedral of Learning is given a medical exam on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh on May 14, 2019.
1155397_web1_PTR-Falcon10-051519
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
An adult peregrine falcon looks inside the windows atop the Cathedral of Learning on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh on May 14, 2019.
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