Baker parlays pizza experience into new Squirrel Hill bagel shop | TribLIVE.com
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Baker parlays pizza experience into new Squirrel Hill bagel shop

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
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JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
Pigeon Bagels in Squirrel Hill will open on July 17. It’s a kosher shop that sells made-by-hand bagels such as plain, sesame seed, poppy seed, garlic and everything.
1412904_web1_PTR-PIGEON
JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
Gab Taube of Regent Square will open Pigeon Bagels in Squirrel Hill on July 17. It’s a kosher shop that sells made-by-hand bagels.
1412904_web1_PTR-PIGEON-OUTSIDE
JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
Pigeon Bagels in Squirrel Hill will open on July 17. It’s a kosher shop that sells made-by-hand bagels.

The idea to open a bagel store in Squirrel Hill came from the inner workings of a pizza shop.

Gab Taube was baking bagels in the middle of the night at A’Pizza Badamo in Mt. Lebanon to sell at various pop-up sites and farmers markets when she decided she needed more time to bake. She also wanted a dedicated space.

The epiphany led to Pigeon Bagels in Squirrel Hill. The Hobart Street store opens Wednesday.

“I really wanted my own store because the business had grown,” Taube said. “It has taken time to get all the appropriate approvals from the city, but we are ready to open. It is 100 percent kosher, and that is extremely important in this neighborhood.”

The shop will sell made-from-scratch plain, sesame seed, poppy seed, garlic and everything bagels baked in the middle of the night so they are fresh daily.

A bagel is $2.25. A dozen cost $21.

Taube, who lives in Regent Square, said she plans to start out with five choices of bagels and some sandwich options using only kosher products and ingredients. The cream cheese is homemade and the vegetables are from Tiny Seed Farm in Allison Park, the owner of which she met at a farmers market. Lox also will be available.

The name for her shop came from the fact that “Taube “ means “pigeon” in German. Taube said she plans to retain the several wholesale accounts she has been servicing through coffee shops and cafes. She has teamed with Redhawk Coffee in Oakland for regular and espresso options.

Taube is a Temple University graduate with a degree in environmental studies.

“Working at a pizza shop inspired me to do something with dough,” she said. “I have always loved being in the food business.”

Hours will be 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays.

Pigeon Bagels is located at 5613 Hobart St.

Details: 412-224-2073 or http://www.pigeonpgh.com

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 412-320-7889, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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