Pittsburgh Pet Expo highlights competitions, adoptions, stage shows | TribLIVE.com
Allegheny

Pittsburgh Pet Expo highlights competitions, adoptions, stage shows

Candy Williams
1915490_web1_gtr-TK-petexpo-03-111419
Courtesy of Pittsburgh Pet Expo
Fetch isn’t usually a water sport, but this dog is having fun at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Pittsburgh.
1915490_web1_gtr-TK-petexpo-01-111419
Courtesy of Pittsburgh Pet Expo
Bill Middleton, known as the Bird Man from Atlantic City’s boardwalk, will teach visitors about Macaws while some of his favorite feathered friends play basketball, ride bicycles and have their photos taken with guests during the Exotic Bird Show at the Pittsburgh Pet Expo Nov. 15-17 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.
1915490_web1_gtr-TK-petexpo-02-111419
Courtesy of Pittsburgh Pet Expo
Dog trainers will demonstrate how to teach an old dog — or a young dog — new tricks in the Animal Arena at the Pittsburgh Pet Expo Nov. 15-17 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

There’s no reason to leave your best friend at home when other members of the family attend this year’s edition of the Pittsburgh Pet Expo.

Pets on leashes also are welcome at the annual three-day event Nov. 15-17 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

Billed as the largest consumer pet trade show on the East Coast, the event features three days of competitions, demonstrations, adoptions, giveaways, continuous stage shows and shopping.

In addition to perennial favorite events ranging from a diving dog competition to a pet costume contest, the Pet Expo will feature new entertainment, including chicken races, hermit crab races, stunt dogs, a Cat Fanciers Association cat show and an exotic bird show.

“It’s a perfect day out for the entire family – parents, kids, even the family pet since there are plenty of ways for pets to take part in the activities,” said Rocco Lamanna, manager of the Pet Expo. “If you’re looking to add a new member to the family, be sure to check out the many adoption opportunities offered by local animal shelters and rescue groups.”

More than 250 vendors will be set up offering pet-related products and services, in addition to shelter and rescue organizations with pets looking for their forever home.

Don’t miss these

A few of the show highlights include:

Laurel Highlands Working Dogs will host a Weight Pulling competition sanctioned by the World Wide Weight Pull Organization (W3PO). Trained dogs pull a weighted cart in single-eliminations until only the strongest dog remains. Dogs registered in advance can participate.

Bill Middleton, known as the Bird Man from Atlantic City’s boardwalk, will teach visitors about macaws while three of his favorite feather friends play basketball, go shopping, ride bicycles and have their photos taken with guests at the Exotic Bird Show.

The UpDog Challenge will combine dogs, humans and Frisbees for a race to accumulate the most points in a variety of live games held all three days of the expo in the Animal Arena.

Carnegie Museum Live Animal Encounter will introduce animals from around the world and share fascinating facts about them in 30-minute shows featuring reptiles, birds and mammals.

Crab Races will invite guests to select their favorite crab from more than 100 natural shell land hermit crabs to participate. After the race, guests can adopt the crab and check out crabitats and supplies.

Besides the fun activities, experts will be on hand to help answer pet owners’ questions about dog behavior issues, how to care for disabled dogs, pet safety in the home, first aid for injured pets and how to teach an old dog – or a young dog – new tricks.

Candy Williams is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.