Police investigating whether Troy Hill shootings that left 1 dead were related | TribLIVE.com
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Police investigating whether Troy Hill shootings that left 1 dead were related

Tom Davidson
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WPXI
Police are investigating two shootings in Troy Hill on June 26, 2019.
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Tom Davidson | Tribune-Review
A chalkboard displayed in a window in the 1600 block of Lowrie Street on Wednesday, June 26, 2019, in Pittsburgh’s Troy Hill neighborhood.
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Tom Davidson | Tribune-Review
The 1600 block of Lowrie Street in Pittsburgh’s Troy Hill neighborghood on Wednesday, June 26, 2019, where Pittsburgh police found a male gunshot victim.
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Tom Davidson | Tribune-Review
The 1600 block of Lowrie Street in Pittsburgh’s Troy Hill neighborghood on Wednesday, June 26, 2019, where Pittsburgh police found a male gunshot victim.
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Tom Davidson | Tribune-Review
The 1300 block of Truax Way in Pittsburgh’s Troy Hill neighborhood on Wednesday, June 26, 2019, where at 3:43 a.m. Pittsburgh police found a man dead after a shooting.
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Tom Davidson | Tribune-Review
The 1300 block of Truax Way in Pittsburgh’s Troy Hill neighborhood on Wednesday, June 26, 2019, where at 3:43 a.m. Pittsburgh police found a man dead after a shooting.

A Troy Hill neighborhood was rocked by gunshots early Wednesday as two shootings left one man dead and another critically wounded.

Pittsburgh police are working to determine if the shootings were related.

A man was shot and killed at 3:43 a.m. Police found him dead on Truax Way. The Allegheny County Medical Examiner’s Office identified him as Christian St. John Jenkins, 27, of Pittsburgh.

Minutes later, police were called to a home in the 1600 block of Lowrie Street where a second man had been shot. When officers arrived, they found a man with gunshot wounds to the face and arm, police said. He was conscious and alert, and taken to a hospital where he was in critical but stable condition, police said.


Tess Drudy, 26, lives on Lowrie Street and was asleep at the time, but said her mother, whose bedroom faces Truax, heard a man say “no, no, no,” before the shooting. Soon the street was filled with police cars, Drudy said. Most people on Truax either weren’t at home or didn’t answer their doors, but Drudy said it’s a quiet area where the biggest problem is people driving too fast on the narrow streets.

Crews worked during the day Wednesday on a gas line replacement project that essentially closed Truax, a narrow alley. There was no visible sign that anything happened.

A woman who said she was a niece of Jenkins said the family was shaken and wasn’t ready to speak about what happened. She declined to give her name.

“His mom’s pretty tore up,” she said.

Tom Davidson and Tawyna Panizzi are Tribune-Review staff writers. You can contact Tom at 724-226-4715, [email protected] or via Twitter @TribDavidson. You can contact Tawnya at 412-782-2121 x1512, [email protected] or via Twitter @tawnyatrib.

Tom Davidson is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Tom at 724-226-4715, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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