Sheetz in Bethel Park hosts a tasting of Coffee Hopz beer | TribLIVE.com
Allegheny

Sheetz in Bethel Park hosts a tasting of Coffee Hopz beer

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
1167592_web1_PTR-SHEETZTASTING-FIRST-1-NEW
JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
David Ashline, (right) territory sales representative from Rusty Rail Brewing watches as Bill Helzlsouer of Dravosburg, drinks a 2 ounce glass of Coffee Hopz, a beer made through a collaboration between Altoona-based Sheetz and Rusty Rail Brewing in Mifflinburg. The tasting was held at the Bethel Park store on Library Road. Helzlsouer was the first to try it.
1167592_web1_PTR-SHEETZTASTING-FIRST
JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
David Ashline, (right) territory sales representative from Rusty Rail Brewing hands Bill Helzlsouer, of Dravosburg, a 2 ounce glass of Coffee Hopz, a beer made through a collaboration between Altoona-based Sheetz and Rusty Rail Brewing in Mifflinburg. The tasting was held at the Bethel Park store on Library Road. Helzlsouer was the first to try it.
1167592_web1_PTR-SHEETZTASTING-051719
JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
Sheetz held a beer tasting on Thursday at the Bethel Park location. It was to introduce the Sheetz Beer Project — "Coffee Hopz," a collaboration between Altoona-based Sheetz and Rusty Rail Brewing Company of Mifflinburg.
1167592_web1_PTR-SHEETZ-NEW-050719
Sheetz
Altoona-based Sheetz is collaborating with Rusty Rail Brewing Company out of Mifflinburg to unveil its first ever craft beer, Project Coffee Hopz, a limited edition coffee bean IPA. A beer tasting was held on Thursday at the Bethel Park location.
1167592_web1_PTR-SHEETTASTING-CAVE
JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
Coffee Hopz, a beer made through a collaboration between Altoona-based Sheetz and Rusty Rail Brewing in Mifflinburg is located insid the Beer Cave at the Bethel Park store on Library Road which is the first to sell the brew.

Bill Helzlsouer of Dravosburg was the first person to try the new Coffee Hopz on Thursday at the Sheetz on Library Road in Bethel Park.

“I really like it,” said Helzlsouer, who has a beer blog, and has written about 472 brews. “It’s crisp, with a nice coffee taste at the end. You don’t have to be a coffee drinker to like this.”

Coffee Hopz is a limited edition coffee bean IPA that’s the collaboration of Altoona-based Sheetz and Rusty Rail Brewing Company of Mifflinburg.

Sheetz hosted a tasting of the brew on Thursday — its first ever craft beer.

Helzlsouer bought some to take to his son, of the same name, who has a beer podcast and inspired his dad to try new beers.

The beer can be purchased at the Bethel Park location. Four-packs of 16-ounce cans cost $7.99.

It will be available at 4 p.m. Tuesday at 54 other stores, including Canonsburg, Moon, Natrona Heights, Ohio Township, and Sewickley.

Gordon Sapko of Bethel Park bought two of the first four packs. He said he had read about the tasting event and said he wanted to be a part of this because it’s a limited edition and might be a collector’s item someday.

“It’ really good,” said Sapko, who frequents the place for gas, food, drinks and snacks and now, beer. “They have been selling beer here for a long time, but this is special because Sheetz is making their own.”

Bethel Park was chosen for the tasting because it’s a successful store, there is plenty of parking and there is a lot of traffic on Library Road, said Nick Ruffner, a Sheetz spokesman.

The brew is something customers have asked for, Ryan Sheetz, assistant vice president of brand strategy at Sheetz told the Tribune-Review at a product launch last week on the South Side. His uncle Bob started the company in 1952 which has become a third generation family business.

Sheetz said they have worked for years to make beer available in the convenience stores across Pennsylvania. It is now available in more than 140 stores across the state.

Brewed with Sheetz Brothers Sumatra coffee beans, the new IPA blend features “light and floral notes with a subtle coffee presence.”

Guy McCarty, brewer director at Rusty Rail, said last week he was nervous at first about the marriage, but the Sheetz people made him feel at home.

Laurie Ashline of Greentree likes the brew.

“It is light, which is perfect for summer,” said Ashline, as she exited the beer cave at the store. “You can taste the coffee but it’s not real strong.”

Details: http://sheetz.com

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 412-320-7889, [email protected] or via Twitter .

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.