State Rep. Kulik reintroduces ‘Alina’s Law,’ named for slain Pitt student | TribLIVE.com
Allegheny

State Rep. Kulik reintroduces ‘Alina’s Law,’ named for slain Pitt student

Megan Guza
851261_web1_Alina-Sheykhet
Facebook
Alina Sheykhet

Another state lawmaker is trying to push forward with a law inspired by a University of Pittsburgh student murdered in 2017 by her ex-boyfriend.

State Rep. Anita Astorino Kulik, D-Kennedy, on Thursday introduced House Bill 588, or Alina’s Law, a year after a similar bill passed the state Senate but was never brought up for a vote in the House.

The bill would give judges the discretion and option to order the defendant in a protection from abuse order to wear an electronic monitoring device.

The proposed law is named for 20-year-old Alina Sheykhet, who was beaten to death by her ex-boyfriend, Matthew Darby, at her off-campus apartment Oct. 8, 2017.

Sheykhet had filed for a PFA about a month prior, and the final order was granted three days before Darby broke in to the Cable Place apartment and killed her.

“Alina, who was a member of the community and whose parents still reside in my district, did her part by filing a PFA against her ex-boyfriend, but it wasn’t enough,” Kulik said in a press release. “The threat on her life fell through the cracks of the state system, and as a result she lost her life.”

Darby pleaded guilty to first-degree murder in October, and he is serving life in prison without the possibility of parole.

The law began to take shape in the months following Sheykhet’s killing. The American Civil Liberties Union emerged in opposition of the law.

“That’s just basically one step below house arrest for those people,” Nyssa Taylor, ACLU Pennsylvania’s criminal justice policy counsel, said in late 2017. “That’s an extraordinary restriction on someone’s liberty without due process.”

But Kulik said Thursday the continued domestic violence-related murders – 117 across the state in 2017 – means more must be done.

“It’s time the commonwealth did its part by guaranteeing the safety of domestic abuse victims and making sure defendants don’t violate these orders,” she said.

Megan Guza is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Megan at 412-380-8519, [email protected] or via Twitter .

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.