Vigilance Theater Group produces immersive theater | TribLIVE.com
Theater & Arts

Vigilance Theater Group produces immersive theater

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
1570256_web1_PTR-MOONSIDE
Courtesy Vigilance Theater Group
Vigilance Theater Group produces immersive theater in its second production, “Welcome to Moonside.”
1570256_web1_PTR-MOONSIDE-1
Courtesy Vigilance Theater Group
Vigilance Theater Group produces immersive theater in its second production, “Welcome to Moonside.”
1570256_web1_PTR-MOONSIDE-2
Courtesy Vigilance Theater Group
Vigilance Theater Group produces immersive theater in its second production, “Welcome to Moonside.”
1570256_web1_PTR-MOONSIDE-3
Courtesy Vigilance Theater Group
Vigilance Theater Group produces immersive theater in its second production "Welcome to Moonside."

There is a theater experience where guests become part of the show.

“Welcome to Moonside” is a production of the Vigilance Theater Group where there is no stage, no curtain.

You, who attend, will be asked to assist evil spirits who are from a place called Moonside. Some of them want you there while others wish you were gone.

Sound like a challenge?

Then come to the former site of the Lava Lounge on Pittsburgh South’s Side at 8 p.m. Thursday through Sunday through Sept. 8. Opening night is Thursday. The space is limited to 20 and tickets are $50. The production runs roughly an hour and 20 minutes. The time can vary because there is some improvisation.

The show is inspired by Earth-bound video games, said Renee Rabenold, the director and co-founder. She said attendees will see actors and actresses dressed in neon outfits.

“We say come in with an open mind,” she said. “We try to make it accessible to both introverts and extroverts. If you choose to engage, what decision will you make? There are no wrong decisions.”

As described on its website, Vigilance was founded in 2018 as “an immersive theater group dedicated to creating intimate, experimental productions.” It draws inspiration “from high art and pop culture alike and is determined to explore the boundaries and possibilities of the growing immersive theater movement.”

“There is a spooky factor and some of it is creepy intriguing,” said Rabenold, of McCandless. “Immersive theater lends itself to that. It’s both a haunted house feel and a theater experience.”

Pittsburgh has become a hotbed for this kind of work, said Sean Collier of the South Side, one of the founders of the theater group.

“It’s a niche way of creating theater,” Collier said. “It invites guests to be a part of it. We are theater where the audience is an essential character. You are in a world of play. You play yourself and there is a reason you are there, to help these characters.”

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 412-320-7889, [email protected] or via Twitter .

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.