South Hills woman accused of urinating on potatoes at Walmart turns herself in | TribLIVE.com
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South Hills woman accused of urinating on potatoes at Walmart turns herself in

Brian C. Rittmeyer
1475219_web1_ptr-potatopee2-073119
West Mifflin Police Department
West Mifflin Police are asking for the public’s help in identifying this woman, who they allege urinated on potatoes at a Walmart in the borough.
1475219_web1_ptr-potatopee-073119
West Mifflin Police Department
West Mifflin Police are asking for the public’s help in identifying this woman, who they allege urinated on potatoes at a Walmart in the borough.

First, there was the ice cream licker.

Now, a woman is accused of — well, altering — food at the Walmart store in West Mifflin.

Police say that a South Hills woman urinated on potatoes at the Walmart on Century Drive.

Grace M. Brown, 20, of Whitehall turned herself into authorities on Tuesday afternoon, West Mifflin police said.

She is charged with open lewdness, criminal mischief, disorderly conduct and public drunkenness, court records show.

The incident happened last Wednesday night, according to a statement from West Mifflin police.

A store employee observed urine on the floor near the potatoes in the produce section, prompting a Walmart loss prevention officer to check the day’s video surveillance footage, police said.

The video showed a woman peeing into the potato bins about 10:10 p.m. on July 24, the Walmart employee told police.

West Mifflin police responded to the report of disorderly conduct shortly before 9 a.m the next day.

After speaking to Walmart officials and reviewing the security footage, detectives identified Brown as their suspect and made contact with her, police said.

Brown came to the police station with an attorney and “identified herself as the person urinating on the potatoes,” police said.

She and her attorney could not immediately be reached.

In a statement, Walmart said that workers had disposed of the affected products and sanitized the area.

“We’re working with the West Mifflin Police Department to find the responsible party and have them prosecuted,” the statement said.

Police also alerted the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Pittsburgh of the incident.

Police in East Texas identified a teenager from San Antonio as the suspect who was licking a tub of Blue Bell ice cream and putting it back in a freezer, also at a Walmart.

Brian C. Rittmeyer is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Brian at 724-226-4701, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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