ShareThis Page
Plum/Oakmont

Oakmont yoga studio raises money for Alzheimer's research during summer solstice

Michael DiVittorio
| Monday, June 25, 2018, 5:39 p.m.
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund.
Owner and instructor Sarah Hummel (back to camera) leads the group at the event.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund. Owner and instructor Sarah Hummel (back to camera) leads the group at the event.
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund.
Addie Galey of Aspinwall works out with the group for the second year.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund. Addie Galey of Aspinwall works out with the group for the second year.
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund.
Five-year-old Cecilia Taradash tries to keep up with the group.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund. Five-year-old Cecilia Taradash tries to keep up with the group.
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund.
Leigh Garbo Minniefield of Oakmont works out with the group.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund. Leigh Garbo Minniefield of Oakmont works out with the group.
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund.
Studio owner and instructor Sarah Hummel (back to camera) leads the group at the event.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund. Studio owner and instructor Sarah Hummel (back to camera) leads the group at the event.
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund. 
Mallory Garvey of Oakmont works out with the group.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Amazing Yoga Oakmont hosted its Summer Solstice for the second straight year. The 600 block of Allegheny River Boulevard was blocked off June 21, allowing people to do yoga in the street, while raising money for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund. Mallory Garvey of Oakmont works out with the group.

Amazing Yoga Oakmont's second annual Summer Solstice Spectacular's on pace to match last year's contribution to Alzheimer's research despite having less participants.

The solstice on June 21, was the longest day of the year for people living north of the equator.

Yoga practitioners across the world took to the streets that day for outdoor stretching and to worship the sun.

The Alzheimer's Association and the borough business also use that day to help raise awareness and funds to fight the most common form of dementia.

Amazing Yoga's inaugural event had 92 participants and raised $1,800 for the Joseph A. Massaro Alzheimer's Research Fund.

The rain kept some folks indoors this time with only 78 people on the mats along Allegheny River Boulevard.

Owner and instructor Sarah Hummel said their generosity was still as bright as the sun as it appeared they matched last year's donation.

β€œI was really happy with the turnout given the weather,” Hummel said. β€œIt's pretty incredible to be out there on the longest day of the year. People have been doing this for thousands of years, and all over the world they continue to do that. It's powerful to be a part of that. The energy of being outside brings something really special.”

Hummel said their goal was $2,000 and she hopes to hit that next year.

More information about the fund and how to donate is available online at pittsburghfoundation.org/Massaro .

Michael DiVittorio is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-871-2367, mdivittorio@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MikeJdiVittorio.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me