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Plum/Oakmont

Mallisee Farm in Plum marks 20th anniversary of corn maze fun

Michael DiVittorio
| Friday, Oct. 19, 2018, 10:30 a.m.
Three-year old Escher Beldhan, 3, finds his way through the children's maze at the Mallisee Farms corn maze on Sunday, October 14. This years maze is open on weekends now through the end of the month.  Lillian DeDomenic  |  For The Tribune Review
Three-year old Escher Beldhan, 3, finds his way through the children's maze at the Mallisee Farms corn maze on Sunday, October 14. This years maze is open on weekends now through the end of the month. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune Review
Theo Dayton, 4, sits high on top of the haystack at the  Mallisee Farms corn maze on Sunday, October 14. This years maze is open on weekends now through the end of the month.  Lillian DeDomenic  |  For The Tribune Review
Theo Dayton, 4, sits high on top of the haystack at the Mallisee Farms corn maze on Sunday, October 14. This years maze is open on weekends now through the end of the month. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune Review
Madolyn Boynton, 18, Oliver Boynton, 11, and Jacob Bair, 16, find their way through the corn maze at Mallisee Farms on Sunday, October 14. This years maze is open on weekends now through the end of the month.  Lillian DeDomenic  |  For The Tribune Review
Madolyn Boynton, 18, Oliver Boynton, 11, and Jacob Bair, 16, find their way through the corn maze at Mallisee Farms on Sunday, October 14. This years maze is open on weekends now through the end of the month. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune Review
Molly Dayton 1, finds her way through the children's maze at the Mallisee Farms corn maze on Sunday, October 14. This years maze is open on weekends now through the end of the month.  Lillian DeDomenic  |  For The Tribune Review
Molly Dayton 1, finds her way through the children's maze at the Mallisee Farms corn maze on Sunday, October 14. This years maze is open on weekends now through the end of the month. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune Review
Catherine Aubele, 21 months of Penn Hills, picks out her favorite pumpkin at Mallisee Farms corn maze on Sunday, October 14. This years maze is open on weekends now through the end of the month.  Lillian DeDomenic  |  For The Tribune Review
Catherine Aubele, 21 months of Penn Hills, picks out her favorite pumpkin at Mallisee Farms corn maze on Sunday, October 14. This years maze is open on weekends now through the end of the month. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune Review

After 20 years, the corn maze at the Mallisee Farm in Plum is still thrilling crowds.

“We’re just glad to be able to do it,” said farm owner Henry Mallisee, 66. “We don’t plan on quitting anytime soon.”

The 3-acre corn maze at 1200 Mallisee Road is open from noon to 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays in October, weather permitting.

The maze is designed and crafted by Mallisee’s wife, Gaye, 66.

Planting for the corn maze starts in June. Cutting continues through September.

And, if you’re wondering, the maze does have an emergency exit.

The family posted wooden critters inside the maze with hole punches for maze runners’ index cards. Those who collect all punches have a chance to win a gift card.

“It’s a lot of work to set up,” Henry Mallisee said. He said they do not keep track of attendance, but this year has been noticeably light due to rain.

“We’ve only been open one day each weekend this year due to the weather,” he said. “We don’t open unless it’s dry enough. Our parking lot is a farm field. We’d have people getting stuck if it’s too wet.”

The maze started out as a business venture two decades ago and has grown into a community tradition.

Henry Mallisee said they first got the idea for the maze after reading several magazines about farmers doing different things to increase their income.

“It’s just as popular as it ever was,” he said. “It’s a little bit different than what other people have, and it seems to be what people like.”

Admission is $5, children age 2 and younger get in free.

Other activities on the farm include a pick-your-own pumpkin patch, an obstacle course, pedal tractors, inflatable horses, crafters, a round-bale hay maze, various children’s games and a petting zoo featuring goats, bunnies and sheep. There are no hayrides.

The farm also sells hay, straw, cornstalks and other items.

More information about Mallisee Farm is available by calling 412-793-0898.

Michael DiVittorio is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Michael at 412-871-2367, mdivittorio@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MikeJdiVittorio.

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