Plum’s Boyce dog park to open this summer | TribLIVE.com
Plum/Oakmont

Plum’s Boyce dog park to open this summer

Michael DiVittorio
1077188_web1_Pal-dogparkupdate6-050219
Axl and Apollo can’t for the new dog park in Boyce Park to be open. The pair, along with their human, Allison Wade, visited to site on Thursday, April 25, to check out the grounds. It won’t be long before they will be running, playing and exercising with many new friends. Full-breed Rottweilers, Axl is 1 year old and Apollo is 2.
1077188_web1_Pal-dogparkupdate1-050219
Axl and Apollo can’t for the new dog park in Boyce Park to be open. The pair, along with their human, Allison Wade, visited to site on Thursday, April 25, to check out the grounds. It won’t be long before they will be running, playing and exercising with many new friends. Full-breed Rottweilers, Axl is 1 year old and Apollo is 2.

One of two dog parks under construction in Boyce Park is projected to be open within a few months.

The Plum parks — each including separate areas for large and small dogs — are near Boyce’s lower baseball field by the basketball courts off New Texas Road.

Allegheny County parks Director Andy Baechle described them as upper and lower dog parks separated by a parking lot.

“We’re excited to get them open,” he said. “We’re thankful for the partnership of Plum to get these together.”

Baechle said the upper park is projected to be complete in June and open by the end of August once the grass has settled.

“The grass needs to get a good set of roots on it,” he said. “(We need) to make sure it’s healthy for the amount of dog traffic.”

Pittsburgh-based Allegheny Fence is installing the fence at both sites.

The lower park is projected to be open in the winter or next spring. It still needs drainage work, a shelter and fencing. Both parks will have water fountains for the pets.

The borough partnered with Allegheny County to build the two leash-free areas with each costing about $100,000.

The entities were to split the cost of construction for design and installation of water lines, and fencing will be split by the borough and county. The county will maintain the sites.

The lower park is at least 53,000 square feet with 40,000 of that for large dogs and 13,000 for small dogs. The upper part is about 44,000 square feet with 33,000 of that for larger dogs and 11,000 for smaller canines.

Baechle said most of the work at the parks will be done in-house, and the parks’ sizes were due to “the lay of the land.”

The county has similar alternating leash-free dog areas in its North and South parks. Dog parks also are located at Hartwood Acres and White Oak, and one is currently under construction at Settlers Cabin.

The Boyce Park dog parks were the dream of Plum resident Allison Wade, who led a grassroots movement to develop an off-leash area in the borough more than two years ago.

She created a Facebook page, “Dog Park for Plum Borough,” in 2017. It currently has 1,211 members offering support, and, of course, photos of their pets.

The group raised about $10,000 for the dog parks through several events and a gofundme.com campaign. Wade was at the sites April 26.

“The parks look great and there is a lot more space than I imagined,” Wade said. “There is a side for big dogs and small dogs. We are not doing any more fundraisers or anything. We are just waiting for the park to open. I know everyone is very eager to get there.”

Michael DiVittorio is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Michael at 412-871-2367, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Local | Plum
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