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Regional

Displaced polar vortex could bring first winter storm to upper Midwest, Northeast

| Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017, 8:51 a.m.
The road to Townsend Park cuts a dark line in the freshly falled snow in Murrysville during the first snowstorm of the season in mid-November 2013. AccuWeather officials said a displaced polar vortex could bring the first 2017 storm to the upper Midwest and Northeast this and next weekend.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
The road to Townsend Park cuts a dark line in the freshly falled snow in Murrysville during the first snowstorm of the season in mid-November 2013. AccuWeather officials said a displaced polar vortex could bring the first 2017 storm to the upper Midwest and Northeast this and next weekend.

A displaced polar vortex is set to bring a chill to the upper Midwest and Northeast as the weekend nears and could make a return appearance in the days leading up to Thanksgiving, according to AccuWeather officials.

The polar vortex is a storm that typically is found within the Arctic Circle.

When the storm becomes dislodged or splits into many parts, the frigid air moves south to the mid-latitude regions around the globe.

“One such southward displacement of arctic air is in progress and will sweep across the upper Midwest and Northeast into this weekend,” said AccuWeather lead long-range meteorologist Paul Pastelok.

A second southward displacement is possible between Nov. 18 and 22, Pastelok said.

The area along the Atlantic Seaboard is often a perfect breeding ground for storms in situations like this, said AccuWeather meteorologist Evan Duffey.

“The clash between the arriving arctic air and the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean could help instigate a major storm several days before Thanksgiving,” Duffey said.

Based on climatology, accumulating snow is much more likely to occur over the higher elevations from north and west of Interstate 95 to the Appalachians into the first part of winter. This is because of the impact of the relatively warm Atlantic Ocean.

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