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Cash-strapped state giving $1 million to Nutting-owned Seven Springs, Hidden Valley

| Friday, Dec. 22, 2017, 4:21 p.m.
Bob Nutting
Bob Nutting

After borrowing $1.5 billion to balance its budget, Pennsylvania is giving $1 million in tax dollars to two resorts owned by the Nutting family.

A state Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program grant that's nominally going to Seven Springs Borough will be used to build two multi-purpose event centers at Seven Springs Mountain Resort and Hidden Valley Resort.

“This funding is crucial to jobs, economic development and promoting tourism expansion in the Laurel Highlands,” Sen. Pat Stefano, R-Bullskin, said in a news release .

“This is the kind of project that will pay dividends in our community for years to come with the expanded jobs and tourism in our region,” said Rep. Carl Walker Metzgar, R-Berlin.

Neither legislative office responded to emails asking for details on how many jobs the grant is supposed to create. A spokeswoman for the resorts couldn't be reached for comment.

The Nuttings also own the Pittsburgh Pirates and Ogden Newspapers.

The RACP program is handled by the budget office, which is inside the governor's office instead of the state Department of Community and Economic Development.

The purpose of the program is to fund projects “that cannot obtain primary funding under other state programs,” according to the budget office's website .

Brian Bowling is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-1218, bbowling@tribweb.com or via Twitter @TribBrian.

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