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Greensburg Diocese to hold special collection for tornado victims

Stephen Huba
| Thursday, March 8, 2018, 11:51 a.m.
A resident walks away from damaged trees and housing debris strewn across North Gallatin Avenue in Uniontown following a tornado in February.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
A resident walks away from damaged trees and housing debris strewn across North Gallatin Avenue in Uniontown following a tornado in February.
Raymond Thomas carries pieces of debris from a yard off of North Gallatin Avenue on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018 in Uniontown. The National Weather Service confirmed that an F1 category tornado touched down causing a large swath of property damage.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Raymond Thomas carries pieces of debris from a yard off of North Gallatin Avenue on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018 in Uniontown. The National Weather Service confirmed that an F1 category tornado touched down causing a large swath of property damage.
Utility company employees work at the scene of extensive damage along North Gallatin Avenue on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018 in Uniontown. A tornado touched down Thursday night, causing extensive damage to several neighborhoods and businesses.
Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Utility company employees work at the scene of extensive damage along North Gallatin Avenue on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018 in Uniontown. A tornado touched down Thursday night, causing extensive damage to several neighborhoods and businesses.

The Diocese of Greensburg is taking up a special collection for the victims of the tornado that touched down in Uniontown on Feb. 15.

Greensburg Bishop Edward C. Malesic has called for a second collection to be taken in all parishes of the diocese the weekend of March 17-18. The four-county diocese includes Fayette County, where Uniontown is the county seat.

Proceeds from the collection will first go to Catholic Charities' relief efforts in Uniontown. Any remaining funds will be placed in a Diocesan Disaster Fund to help meet future needs.

In his letter to pastors calling for the collection, Malesic noted that more than 230 homes were damaged and 47 declared uninhabitable as a result of the storm.

He noted that through the generosity of parishioners, parishes and Catholic organizations, and through the organizational efforts of Catholic Charities, the diocese provided more than $185,000 in assistance to people who suffered serious losses from the flash flood that hit the Connellsville area in 2016.

The funds from the March 17-18 special collection will be made available through Catholic Charities in a manner similar to the response to the Connellsville disaster, Malesic said.

The bishop also asked for prayers for the victims and offered thanks that there were no deaths as a result of the tornado.

Stephen Huba is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-1280, shuba@tribweb.com or via Twitter @shuba_trib.

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