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PennDOT, DCED announce new statewide bicycle routes

Emily Balser
| Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 11:03 a.m.
A bicycle commuter makes his way on a path along the Rhine river on February 12, 2018 in Mainz.  / AFP PHOTO / dpa / Fabian Sommer / Germany OUTFABIAN SOMMER/AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images
A bicycle commuter makes his way on a path along the Rhine river on February 12, 2018 in Mainz. / AFP PHOTO / dpa / Fabian Sommer / Germany OUTFABIAN SOMMER/AFP/Getty Images

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and the Department of Community and Economic Development on Tuesday announced the designation of two new U.S. Bicycle routes in Pennsylvania.

The designation of U.S. Bicycle Routes 30 and 36 create interstate bicycle routes in Pennsylvania, which officials believe could bring long-term economic benefits from out-of-state tourism to local communities.

U.S. Bicycle Route 30 extends nearly 50 miles along the shore of Lake Erie, from Ohio to New York, and is locally known as BicyclePA Route Z. Cyclists using the route will ride along the Seaway Trail Scenic Byway past beaches, historic lighthouses and Presque Isle State Park.

U.S. Bicycle Route 36 extends nearly 400 miles across the center of Pennsylvania, from Ohio to New York, and is locally known as BicyclePA Route Y. This route follows much of U.S. Route 6, which was one of the first highways used to move natural resources, people and products across the country.

The route showcases U.S. industrial history, including the first underground mine, the first steam locomotive and the first lighthouse on the Great Lakes. U.S. Bicycle Route 36 will also go through the Allegheny National Forest, Lake Erie and the Pennsylvania Grand Canyon.

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