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Over $7.2 million coming to Pittsburgh region to upgrade traffic signals

Dillon Carr
| Friday, July 13, 2018, 11:54 a.m.
Vehicles drive through a green light at the intersection of Pittsburgh and Butler streets in Springdale Borough in February 2018.
Vehicles drive through a green light at the intersection of Pittsburgh and Butler streets in Springdale Borough in February 2018.

More than a dozen communities in southwestern Pennsylvania counties will receive over $7.2 million from PennDOT to upgrade traffic signals at intersections, according to a news release from Gov. Tom Wolf’s office.

The money is part of PennDOT’s “Green Light-Go” grant program, which granted $31 million to 70 municipalities across the state in 2018. This year marks the program’s fourth round of funding that allows municipalities to make improvements to traffic signals.

Below is a list of projects happening in Allegheny, Butler and Washington counties:

Allegheny County

• Allegheny County — $3,560,565 for improvements to pedestrian facilities at 35 traffic signals in the City of Pittsburgh’s Central Business District.

• Bellevue Borough — $32,000 to install new LED traffic signal heads, new countdown pedestrian signals and new audible push buttons at the traffic signal at North and South Freemont and Lincoln avenues.

• Carnegie Borough — $22,640 to update traffic signal timings at the intersection of Main and Jefferson streets.

• Crafton Borough — $704,051 to modernize four traffic signals along Noble and Crennell avenues.

• Edgewood Borough — $139,478 to modernize the traffic signal at Maple Avenue and Edgewood/Swissvale to include LED signal heads with mast arm installation, loop detection, countdown pedestrian signals and ADA-compliant curb ramps.

• Jefferson Hills Borough — $87,684 to modernize a traffic signal at River, Walton and Glass House roads, including new strain poles, signal heads and a signal controller.

• Marshall Township — $562,191 to install an adaptive traffic signal system at six intersections along State Route 910 near I-79.

• Monroeville Borough — $226,709 for modernization of a traffic signal at Monroeville Boulevard and Wyngate Drive.

• Mount Lebanon Township — $220,000 for replacement of the traffic signal at the intersection of Bower Hill Road and North Wren and Firwood drives to accommodate realignment to a four-way intersection.

• Penn Hills Township — $45,372 for LED replacement at four intersections along Frankstown and Verona roads.

• Scott Township — $304,800 to upgrade seven traffic signals along Bower Hill and Greentree roads including, complete replacement of a signal at Bower Hill and Vanadium roads, retiming and coordination, a southbound left-turn advance phase for Bower Hill Road at Painters Run, and detection upgrades.

• Versailles Borough — $265,191 for modernization of two intersections including replacing outdated signal controllers, vehicular and pedestrian signal heads, pushbuttons, and installation of new emergency vehicle preemption and radar detection.

• White Oak Borough — $601,808 for modernization of six intersections, including replacing outdated signal controllers, vehicular and pedestrian signal heads, pushbuttons, and installation of new emergency vehicle preemption and radar detection.

Butler County

• Butler Township — $415,686 to modernize equipment at 17 traffic signals including signal controllers, vehicular and pedestrian signal heads and push buttons. Emergency preemption and radar detection will also be added.

Washington County

• Chartiers Township — $46,400 for modernization to the traffic signal at Pike Street, Allison Hollow and Racetrack roads, including ADA-compliant pedestrian accommodations, installation of radar detection and additional left turn phases.

Dillon Carr is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Dillon at 412-871-2325, dcarr@tribweb.com or via Twitter @dillonswriting.

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